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Title: Finalize field testing of cold climate heat pump (CCHP) based on tandem vapor injection compressors

Abstract

This report describes the system diagram and control algorithm of a prototype air-source cold climate heat pump (CCHP) using tandem vapor injection (VI) compressors. The prototype was installed in Fairbanks, Alaska and underwent field testing starting in 09/2016. The field testing results of the past six months, including compressor run time fractions, measured COPs and heating capacities, etc., are presented as a function of the ambient temperature. Two lessons learned are also reported.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Building Technologies Research and Integration Center (BTRIC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1357984
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2017/176
BT0302000; CEBT002
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; Cold Climate Heat Pump

Citation Formats

Shen, Bo, Baxter, Van D., Abdelaziz, Omar, and Rice, C. Keith. Finalize field testing of cold climate heat pump (CCHP) based on tandem vapor injection compressors. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1357984.
Shen, Bo, Baxter, Van D., Abdelaziz, Omar, & Rice, C. Keith. Finalize field testing of cold climate heat pump (CCHP) based on tandem vapor injection compressors. United States. doi:10.2172/1357984.
Shen, Bo, Baxter, Van D., Abdelaziz, Omar, and Rice, C. Keith. Wed . "Finalize field testing of cold climate heat pump (CCHP) based on tandem vapor injection compressors". United States. doi:10.2172/1357984. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1357984.
@article{osti_1357984,
title = {Finalize field testing of cold climate heat pump (CCHP) based on tandem vapor injection compressors},
author = {Shen, Bo and Baxter, Van D. and Abdelaziz, Omar and Rice, C. Keith},
abstractNote = {This report describes the system diagram and control algorithm of a prototype air-source cold climate heat pump (CCHP) using tandem vapor injection (VI) compressors. The prototype was installed in Fairbanks, Alaska and underwent field testing starting in 09/2016. The field testing results of the past six months, including compressor run time fractions, measured COPs and heating capacities, etc., are presented as a function of the ambient temperature. Two lessons learned are also reported.},
doi = {10.2172/1357984},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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