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Title: Design Analysis of SNS Target StationBiological Shielding Monoligh with Proton Power Uprate

Abstract

This report documents the analysis of the dose rate in the experiment area outside the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) target station shielding monolith with proton beam energy of 1.3 GeV. The analysis implemented a coupled three dimensional (3D)/two dimensional (2D) approach that used both the Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended (MCNPX) 3D Monte Carlo code and the Discrete Ordinates Transport (DORT) two dimensional deterministic code. The analysis with proton beam energy of 1.3 GeV showed that the dose rate in continuously occupied areas on the lateral surface outside the SNS target station shielding monolith is less than 0.25 mrem/h, which complies with the SNS facility design objective. However, the methods and codes used in this analysis are out of date and unsupported, and the 2D approximation of the target shielding monolith does not accurately represent the geometry. We recommend that this analysis is updated with modern codes and libraries such as ADVANTG or SHIFT. These codes have demonstrated very high efficiency in performing full 3D radiation shielding analyses of similar and even more difficult problems.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1357971
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2016/705
KC0402010; ERKCSTS; SNS-106100200-TR0219-R00
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; 42 ENGINEERING

Citation Formats

Bekar, Kursat B., and Ibrahim, Ahmad M.. Design Analysis of SNS Target StationBiological Shielding Monoligh with Proton Power Uprate. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1357971.
Bekar, Kursat B., & Ibrahim, Ahmad M.. Design Analysis of SNS Target StationBiological Shielding Monoligh with Proton Power Uprate. United States. doi:10.2172/1357971.
Bekar, Kursat B., and Ibrahim, Ahmad M.. Mon . "Design Analysis of SNS Target StationBiological Shielding Monoligh with Proton Power Uprate". United States. doi:10.2172/1357971. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1357971.
@article{osti_1357971,
title = {Design Analysis of SNS Target StationBiological Shielding Monoligh with Proton Power Uprate},
author = {Bekar, Kursat B. and Ibrahim, Ahmad M.},
abstractNote = {This report documents the analysis of the dose rate in the experiment area outside the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) target station shielding monolith with proton beam energy of 1.3 GeV. The analysis implemented a coupled three dimensional (3D)/two dimensional (2D) approach that used both the Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended (MCNPX) 3D Monte Carlo code and the Discrete Ordinates Transport (DORT) two dimensional deterministic code. The analysis with proton beam energy of 1.3 GeV showed that the dose rate in continuously occupied areas on the lateral surface outside the SNS target station shielding monolith is less than 0.25 mrem/h, which complies with the SNS facility design objective. However, the methods and codes used in this analysis are out of date and unsupported, and the 2D approximation of the target shielding monolith does not accurately represent the geometry. We recommend that this analysis is updated with modern codes and libraries such as ADVANTG or SHIFT. These codes have demonstrated very high efficiency in performing full 3D radiation shielding analyses of similar and even more difficult problems.},
doi = {10.2172/1357971},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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