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Title: Native Vegetation Performance under a Solar PV Array at the National Wind Technology Center

Abstract

Construction activities at most large-scale ground installations of photovoltaic (PV) arrays are preceded by land clearing and re-grading to uniform slope and smooth surface conditions to facilitate convenient construction access and facility operations. The impact to original vegetation is usually total eradication followed by installation of a gravel cover kept clear of vegetation by use of herbicides. The degree to which that total loss can be mitigated by some form of revegetation is a subject in its infancy, and most vegetation studies at PV development sites only address weed control and the impact of tall plants on the efficiency of the solar collectors from shading.This study seeks to address this void, advancing the state of knowledge of how constructed PV arrays affect ground-level environments, and to what degree plant cover, having acceptable characteristics within engineering constraints, can be re-established.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  2. ESCO Associates Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1357887
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-1900-66218
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; PV array; vegetation impact; revegetation; solar collectors; plants; plant recovery; ground environment

Citation Formats

Beatty, Brenda, Macknick, Jordan, McCall, James, Braus, Genevieve, and Buckner, David. Native Vegetation Performance under a Solar PV Array at the National Wind Technology Center. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1357887.
Beatty, Brenda, Macknick, Jordan, McCall, James, Braus, Genevieve, & Buckner, David. Native Vegetation Performance under a Solar PV Array at the National Wind Technology Center. United States. doi:10.2172/1357887.
Beatty, Brenda, Macknick, Jordan, McCall, James, Braus, Genevieve, and Buckner, David. Tue . "Native Vegetation Performance under a Solar PV Array at the National Wind Technology Center". United States. doi:10.2172/1357887. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1357887.
@article{osti_1357887,
title = {Native Vegetation Performance under a Solar PV Array at the National Wind Technology Center},
author = {Beatty, Brenda and Macknick, Jordan and McCall, James and Braus, Genevieve and Buckner, David},
abstractNote = {Construction activities at most large-scale ground installations of photovoltaic (PV) arrays are preceded by land clearing and re-grading to uniform slope and smooth surface conditions to facilitate convenient construction access and facility operations. The impact to original vegetation is usually total eradication followed by installation of a gravel cover kept clear of vegetation by use of herbicides. The degree to which that total loss can be mitigated by some form of revegetation is a subject in its infancy, and most vegetation studies at PV development sites only address weed control and the impact of tall plants on the efficiency of the solar collectors from shading.This study seeks to address this void, advancing the state of knowledge of how constructed PV arrays affect ground-level environments, and to what degree plant cover, having acceptable characteristics within engineering constraints, can be re-established.},
doi = {10.2172/1357887},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 16 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue May 16 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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