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Title: Modeling of a Multi-Tube Solar Reactor for Hydrogen Production at High Temperatures

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1357733
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-550-44180
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2007 ASME Energy Sustainability Conference (ES2007), 27-30 June 2007, Long Beach, California
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; solar reactor; hydrogen; high-flux solar furnace

Citation Formats

Haussener, Sophia, Hirsch, David, Perkins, Christopher, Weimer, Alan, Lewandowski, Al, and Steinfeld, Aldo. Modeling of a Multi-Tube Solar Reactor for Hydrogen Production at High Temperatures. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1115/ES2007-36245.
Haussener, Sophia, Hirsch, David, Perkins, Christopher, Weimer, Alan, Lewandowski, Al, & Steinfeld, Aldo. Modeling of a Multi-Tube Solar Reactor for Hydrogen Production at High Temperatures. United States. doi:10.1115/ES2007-36245.
Haussener, Sophia, Hirsch, David, Perkins, Christopher, Weimer, Alan, Lewandowski, Al, and Steinfeld, Aldo. Mon . "Modeling of a Multi-Tube Solar Reactor for Hydrogen Production at High Temperatures". United States. doi:10.1115/ES2007-36245.
@article{osti_1357733,
title = {Modeling of a Multi-Tube Solar Reactor for Hydrogen Production at High Temperatures},
author = {Haussener, Sophia and Hirsch, David and Perkins, Christopher and Weimer, Alan and Lewandowski, Al and Steinfeld, Aldo},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1115/ES2007-36245},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • Abstract not provided.
  • A solar reactor consisting of a cavity-receiver containing an array of tubular absorbers is considered for performing the ZnO-dissociation as part of a two-step H{sub 2}O-splitting thermochemical cycle using concentrated solar energy. The continuity, momentum, and energy governing equations that couple the rate of heat transfer to the Arrhenius-type reaction kinetics are formulated for an absorbing-emitting-scattering particulate media and numerically solved using a computational fluid dynamics code. Parametric simulations were carried out to examine the influence of the solar flux concentration ratio (3000-6000 suns), number of tubes (1-10), ZnO mass flow rate (2-20 g/min per tube), and ZnO particle sizemore » (0.06-1 {mu}m) on the reactor's performance. The reaction extent reaches completion within 1 s residence time at above 2000 K, yielding a solar-to-chemical energy conversion efficiency of up to 29%.« less
  • The generation of fuels and chemicals from commonly available feedstocks using concentrated solar energy is of major importance to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) solar thermal research program. In general, chemical reactions yielding these desirable end products must be conducted with significant thermal input at elevated temperatures. Such thermal requirements match well with the potential of point-focusing mirror systems such as the Advanced Components Test Facility (ACTF) operated by the Georgia Institute of Technology for DOE. Accordingly, a program to develop a solar driven chemical reactor has been initiated as one task assigned to the Solar Thermal Advanced Researchmore » Center located at Georgia Tech. One particularly interesting concept for converting concentrated solar radiation into chemical bond energy employs the direct flux heated particle entrainment reactor. In this scheme, finely ground solid reactants and/or catalysts are carried in a gaseous reactant flowing through a region of intense flux. In theory, the entrained particulate lends opacity to the flow, absorbs the concentrated incident solar energy, heats and chemically interacts with the surrounding media. For any given reaction this process can be quite complex. Final product composition may depend on such variables as particle surface temperature, gas temperature, heating rate profile, time of particle exposure to radiation (residence time), particle size distribution, presence of catalysts, and spectral distribution of the radiation.« less
  • Abstract not provided.