skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Design and Analysis of a Large Solar Industrial Heat Plant for Frito Lay in Modesto California

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; Frito Lay North America
OSTI Identifier:
1357723
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-670-44176
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2007 ASME Energy Sustainability Conference (ES2007), 27-30 June 2007, Long Beach, California
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; solar thermal; parabolic trough; industrial process heat

Citation Formats

Walker, Andy, Kutscher, Chuck, Halvorsen, Al, McKenna, Chris, Chambers, Dave, and May, Ken. Design and Analysis of a Large Solar Industrial Heat Plant for Frito Lay in Modesto California. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1115/ES2007-36050.
Walker, Andy, Kutscher, Chuck, Halvorsen, Al, McKenna, Chris, Chambers, Dave, & May, Ken. Design and Analysis of a Large Solar Industrial Heat Plant for Frito Lay in Modesto California. United States. doi:10.1115/ES2007-36050.
Walker, Andy, Kutscher, Chuck, Halvorsen, Al, McKenna, Chris, Chambers, Dave, and May, Ken. Mon . "Design and Analysis of a Large Solar Industrial Heat Plant for Frito Lay in Modesto California". United States. doi:10.1115/ES2007-36050.
@article{osti_1357723,
title = {Design and Analysis of a Large Solar Industrial Heat Plant for Frito Lay in Modesto California},
author = {Walker, Andy and Kutscher, Chuck and Halvorsen, Al and McKenna, Chris and Chambers, Dave and May, Ken},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1115/ES2007-36050},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • The use of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) collectors (e.g., parabolic trough or linear Fresnel systems) for industrial thermal applications has been increasing in global interest in the last few years. In particular, the European Union has been tracking the deployment of Solar Industrial Process Heat (SIPH) plants. Although relatively few plants have been deployed in the United States (U.S.), we establish that 29% of primary energy consumption in the U.S. manufacturing sector is used for process heating. Perhaps the best opportunities for SIPH reside in the state of California due to its excellent solar resource, strong industrial base, and solar-friendlymore » policies. This initial analysis identified 48 TWhth/year of process heat demand in certain California industries versus a technical solar-thermal energy potential of 23,000 TWhth/year. The top five users of industrial steam in the state are highlighted and special attention paid to the food sector that has been an early adopter of SIPH in other countries. A comparison of the cost of heat from solar-thermal collectors versus the cost of industrial natural gas in California indicates that SIPH may be cost effective even under the relatively low gas prices seen in 2014. A recommended next step is the identification of pilot project candidates to promote the deployment of SIPH facilities.« less
  • The findings and projections of this preliminary definition and characterization of a solar industrial process heat technology and manufacturing plant for the year 2000 indicate that the technology and the manufacturing would be significantly more sophisticated and expanded than exists in the solar industry today. The solar process heat technology is defined to be a parabolic trough collector system and to utilize a combination of the more advanced materials and components under current development. The manufacturing operations are projected to include glass-making, silvering, electroplating and plastic-forming, which, while standard industrial procedures, will be additions to or expansions of existing solarmore » manufacturing plants. These integrated operations for the year 2000 solar facility will introduce important environmental residuals which will need to be managed and controlled to satisfy local, state, and federal environmental standards. It can be anticipated that the development and growth of the solar manufacturing industry across the nation can produce a shift in both economic activity and environmental impacts to the centers of solar energy utilization.« less
  • Energetics Corporation (formerly Monument Solar Corporation) has recently completed the conceptual design of an industrial process heat solar system for the Southern Union Refining Company's Famariss Refinery in Lovington, New Mexico. A total solar field of 936 m/sup 2/ (10,080 ft/sup 2/) of concentrating parabolic trough collectors will provide heated heat transfer oil to a solar steam generator for the production of 1.28 MPa (170 psig) dry saturated steam at 191/sup 0/C (375 F). System performance projections indicate that the annual solar system efficiency will be about 40% and will provide an annual equivalent fossil fuel energy savings of nearlymore » 122,000 m/sup 3/ (4.3 MMcf) of natural gas. The system conceptual design and the associated engineering design considerations are discussed.« less
  • Several issues which are essential for making solar industrial process heat systems cost-effective are identified. These issues are examined under the following headings (1) industrial process interface, (2) solar collector selection, (3) roof versus ground mounting of collectors, (4) roof-mounted structure analysis, (5) tax incentives, and (6) mass production effects.
  • A large number of handbooks have been written on the subject of designing solar heating and cooling systems for buildings. One of these is summarized here. Design Approaches for Solar Industrial Process Heat Systems, published in September 1982, addresses the complete spectrum of problems associated with the design of a solar IPH system. A highly general method, derived from computer simulations, is presented for determining actual energy delivered to the process load. Also covered are siting and selection of subsystem components, cost estimation, safety and environmental considerations, and installation concerns. An overview of the design methodology developed is given andmore » some specific examples of technical issues addressed are provided.« less