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Title: Structural basis for LIN54 recognition of CHR elements in cell cycle-regulated promoters

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
OSTI Identifier:
1357644
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nature Communications; Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 7
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Marceau, Aimee H., Felthousen, Jessica G., Goetsch, Paul D., Iness, Audra N., Lee, Hsiau-Wei, Tripathi, Sarvind M., Strome, Susan, Litovchick, Larisa, and Rubin, Seth M.. Structural basis for LIN54 recognition of CHR elements in cell cycle-regulated promoters. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1038/ncomms12301.
Marceau, Aimee H., Felthousen, Jessica G., Goetsch, Paul D., Iness, Audra N., Lee, Hsiau-Wei, Tripathi, Sarvind M., Strome, Susan, Litovchick, Larisa, & Rubin, Seth M.. Structural basis for LIN54 recognition of CHR elements in cell cycle-regulated promoters. United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms12301.
Marceau, Aimee H., Felthousen, Jessica G., Goetsch, Paul D., Iness, Audra N., Lee, Hsiau-Wei, Tripathi, Sarvind M., Strome, Susan, Litovchick, Larisa, and Rubin, Seth M.. 2016. "Structural basis for LIN54 recognition of CHR elements in cell cycle-regulated promoters". United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms12301.
@article{osti_1357644,
title = {Structural basis for LIN54 recognition of CHR elements in cell cycle-regulated promoters},
author = {Marceau, Aimee H. and Felthousen, Jessica G. and Goetsch, Paul D. and Iness, Audra N. and Lee, Hsiau-Wei and Tripathi, Sarvind M. and Strome, Susan and Litovchick, Larisa and Rubin, Seth M.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1038/ncomms12301},
journal = {Nature Communications},
number = 7,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
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