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Title: Diode-based additive manufacturing of metals using an optically-addressable light valve

Abstract

We present that Selective Laser Melting (SLM) of metal powder bed layers, whereby 3D metal objects can be printed from a digital file with unprecedented design flexibility, is spurring manufacturing innovations in medical, automotive, aerospace and textile industries. Because SLM is based on raster-scanning a laser beam over each layer, the process is relatively slow compared to most traditional manufacturing methods (hours to days), thus limiting wider spread use. Here we demonstrate the use of a large area, photolithographic method for 3D metal printing, using an optically-addressable light valve (OALV) as the photomask, to print entire layers of metal powder at once. An optical sheet of multiplexed ~5 kW, 20 ms laser diode and ~1 MW, 7 ns Q-switched laser pulses are used to selectively melt each layer. Finally, the patterning of near infrared light is accomplished by imaging 470 nm light onto the transmissive OALV, which consists of polarization-selective nematic liquid crystal sandwiched between a photoconductor and transparent conductor for switching.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [3]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Science Directorate and Materials Science Division, Physical & Life Sciences Directorate
  2. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Science Directorate
  3. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Engineering Division
  4. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Science Division, Physical & Life Sciences Directorate
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1357403
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-716778
Journal ID: ISSN 1094-4087; OPEXFF
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344; 14-SI-004
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Optics Express
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 25; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 1094-4087
Publisher:
Optical Society of America (OSA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; Additive Manufacturing; Powder Bed Fusion; Laser Materials Processing; Laser Diodes; Stereolithography; Scalable Manufacturing

Citation Formats

Matthews, Manyalibo J., Guss, Gabe, Drachenberg, Derrek R., Demuth, James A., Heebner, John E., Duoss, Eric B., Kuntz, Joshua D., and Spadaccini, Christopher M. Diode-based additive manufacturing of metals using an optically-addressable light valve. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1364/OE.25.011788.
Matthews, Manyalibo J., Guss, Gabe, Drachenberg, Derrek R., Demuth, James A., Heebner, John E., Duoss, Eric B., Kuntz, Joshua D., & Spadaccini, Christopher M. Diode-based additive manufacturing of metals using an optically-addressable light valve. United States. doi:10.1364/OE.25.011788.
Matthews, Manyalibo J., Guss, Gabe, Drachenberg, Derrek R., Demuth, James A., Heebner, John E., Duoss, Eric B., Kuntz, Joshua D., and Spadaccini, Christopher M. Wed . "Diode-based additive manufacturing of metals using an optically-addressable light valve". United States. doi:10.1364/OE.25.011788. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1357403.
@article{osti_1357403,
title = {Diode-based additive manufacturing of metals using an optically-addressable light valve},
author = {Matthews, Manyalibo J. and Guss, Gabe and Drachenberg, Derrek R. and Demuth, James A. and Heebner, John E. and Duoss, Eric B. and Kuntz, Joshua D. and Spadaccini, Christopher M.},
abstractNote = {We present that Selective Laser Melting (SLM) of metal powder bed layers, whereby 3D metal objects can be printed from a digital file with unprecedented design flexibility, is spurring manufacturing innovations in medical, automotive, aerospace and textile industries. Because SLM is based on raster-scanning a laser beam over each layer, the process is relatively slow compared to most traditional manufacturing methods (hours to days), thus limiting wider spread use. Here we demonstrate the use of a large area, photolithographic method for 3D metal printing, using an optically-addressable light valve (OALV) as the photomask, to print entire layers of metal powder at once. An optical sheet of multiplexed ~5 kW, 20 ms laser diode and ~1 MW, 7 ns Q-switched laser pulses are used to selectively melt each layer. Finally, the patterning of near infrared light is accomplished by imaging 470 nm light onto the transmissive OALV, which consists of polarization-selective nematic liquid crystal sandwiched between a photoconductor and transparent conductor for switching.},
doi = {10.1364/OE.25.011788},
journal = {Optics Express},
number = 10,
volume = 25,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed May 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed May 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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