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Title: Effects of EMF Emissions from Cables and Junction Boxes on Marine Species

Abstract

Studies have shown that diverse aquatic species are electrosensitive. Many fishes, and marine mammals, can either detect, navigate by, or are affected by electromagnetic fields (EMF) with various sensitivities, and their behavior may be impacted by unnatural EMF emissions in the water column. Sharks, rays and skates are known to have the highest sensitivity to electric fields. Electric field emissions in the range 0.5–100 micro volt/m appear to attract them, and emissions over 100 micro volt/m to repulse them. A marine hydrokinetic MHK device will have multiple components and associated multiple submarine cables on the seafloor and running through the water column and would potentially increase the level of EMF emissions to which the marine species at the site may be exposed to. There are therefore concerns amongst stakeholders that EMF emissions associated with MHK devices and their components may act as barriers to species migration, cause disorientation, change community compositions and ecosystems, and that they may attract sharks, leading to a local increase in the risk of shark attacks. However, field data to validate and model potential relationships between observed responses and the EMF emissions in situ are sparse. A program of experimental field surveys were conducted off themore » coast of South Florida, USA to characterize the electromagnetic field (EMF) emissions in the water column from a submarine cable, and to monitor for responses of local aquatic species. The field surveys were conducted at the South Florida Ocean Measurement Facility (SFOMF) off Fort Lauderdale, which is a cabled offshore in-water navy range. It consists of multiple active submarine power cables and a number of junction boxes, with the capability to transmit AC/DC power at a range of strength and frequencies. The site includes significant marine life activities and community structure, including highly mobile species, such as sharks, stingrays, mammals and turtles. SFOMF therefore typifies a setting representative of an offshore location where a MHK device may be sited. Background electromagnetic field (EMF) levels and EMF emissions due to submarine cables were measured using a custom E-field sensor and a commercial magnetometer deployed from an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) at various fixed altitudes above the seafloor. EMF signatures detected from power cables and junction boxes are contrasted against ambient background levels and other EMF sources. The potential responses of local marine species were observed at selected representative locations using divers on SCUBA, complemented with fixed cameras on the sea bottom and by a set of video cameras mounted on the AUV. The objectives of the study were: 1) to characterize the EMF emission levels associated with submarine cables 2) to monitor potential responses of aquatic animals to the emissions and 3) to develop an associated database of field observations. As control, observations of EMF levels and in situ marine species were conducted with power in the cable turned off. Good quality measurements of EMF emissions were obtained using the mobile AUV platform and the data from the surveys were used to develop contour maps of the EMF levels in the water column above the live cable as well as to provide information about how the field decays away from the cable. The measurements show good agreement with theoretical models of the how EMF levels decay away from the cable in deep and shallow water environment. Electric fields in excess of 200µV/m were measured in the vicinity of the cable during the power on state. Quarterly surveys by SCUBA divers were conducted, using point and transect count methods, over a period of one year at three locations, one at a shallow site where the water depth is approximately 5m, and the other at the Barracuda Reef where the water depth is approximately 10m. The sampling results were analyzed to determine if the presence of an SFOMF generated EMF alters: (1) abundance, species richness, and assemblage structure of coral reef fishes, (2) the behavior of fishes including elasmobranchs, and (3) the distribution of marine turtles and mammals. Diver observations were also used in attempt to discern if there were any noticeable organismal responses during the transitional period between ambient OFF to energized AC or DC power states, and video footage was intended to augment the in-situ visual survey data and aid in interpretation of the results. Comparisons are provided between observation datasets between the three sites and between the point and transect count methods. Presence of several individual elasmobranch species, including sharks and stingrays, were recorded during the surveys. No apparent effect on richness could be discerned between the power on and off states. No apparent sudden animal movements were observed during transitions between power states.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [3]
  1. Florida Atlantic Univ., Boca Raton, FL (United States)
  2. Nova Southeastern Univ., Fort Lauderdale, FL (United States)
  3. Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Carderock Division (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Florida Atlantic Univ., Boca Raton, FL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1357262
Report Number(s):
DOEFAU-0006386
DOE Contract Number:
EE0006386
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 16 TIDAL AND WAVE POWER; 17 WIND ENERGY; 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; EMF Emissions; Subsea cables; AUV-based measurements; Scuba diver based observations

Citation Formats

Dhanak, Manhar, Spieler, Richard, Kilfoyle, Kirk, Jermain, Robert F., Frankenfield, John, Ravenna, Shirley, Dibiasio, Christopher, Coulson, Robert, Henderson, Ed, and Venezia, William. Effects of EMF Emissions from Cables and Junction Boxes on Marine Species. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1357262.
Dhanak, Manhar, Spieler, Richard, Kilfoyle, Kirk, Jermain, Robert F., Frankenfield, John, Ravenna, Shirley, Dibiasio, Christopher, Coulson, Robert, Henderson, Ed, & Venezia, William. Effects of EMF Emissions from Cables and Junction Boxes on Marine Species. United States. doi:10.2172/1357262.
Dhanak, Manhar, Spieler, Richard, Kilfoyle, Kirk, Jermain, Robert F., Frankenfield, John, Ravenna, Shirley, Dibiasio, Christopher, Coulson, Robert, Henderson, Ed, and Venezia, William. Thu . "Effects of EMF Emissions from Cables and Junction Boxes on Marine Species". United States. doi:10.2172/1357262. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1357262.
@article{osti_1357262,
title = {Effects of EMF Emissions from Cables and Junction Boxes on Marine Species},
author = {Dhanak, Manhar and Spieler, Richard and Kilfoyle, Kirk and Jermain, Robert F. and Frankenfield, John and Ravenna, Shirley and Dibiasio, Christopher and Coulson, Robert and Henderson, Ed and Venezia, William},
abstractNote = {Studies have shown that diverse aquatic species are electrosensitive. Many fishes, and marine mammals, can either detect, navigate by, or are affected by electromagnetic fields (EMF) with various sensitivities, and their behavior may be impacted by unnatural EMF emissions in the water column. Sharks, rays and skates are known to have the highest sensitivity to electric fields. Electric field emissions in the range 0.5–100 micro volt/m appear to attract them, and emissions over 100 micro volt/m to repulse them. A marine hydrokinetic MHK device will have multiple components and associated multiple submarine cables on the seafloor and running through the water column and would potentially increase the level of EMF emissions to which the marine species at the site may be exposed to. There are therefore concerns amongst stakeholders that EMF emissions associated with MHK devices and their components may act as barriers to species migration, cause disorientation, change community compositions and ecosystems, and that they may attract sharks, leading to a local increase in the risk of shark attacks. However, field data to validate and model potential relationships between observed responses and the EMF emissions in situ are sparse. A program of experimental field surveys were conducted off the coast of South Florida, USA to characterize the electromagnetic field (EMF) emissions in the water column from a submarine cable, and to monitor for responses of local aquatic species. The field surveys were conducted at the South Florida Ocean Measurement Facility (SFOMF) off Fort Lauderdale, which is a cabled offshore in-water navy range. It consists of multiple active submarine power cables and a number of junction boxes, with the capability to transmit AC/DC power at a range of strength and frequencies. The site includes significant marine life activities and community structure, including highly mobile species, such as sharks, stingrays, mammals and turtles. SFOMF therefore typifies a setting representative of an offshore location where a MHK device may be sited. Background electromagnetic field (EMF) levels and EMF emissions due to submarine cables were measured using a custom E-field sensor and a commercial magnetometer deployed from an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) at various fixed altitudes above the seafloor. EMF signatures detected from power cables and junction boxes are contrasted against ambient background levels and other EMF sources. The potential responses of local marine species were observed at selected representative locations using divers on SCUBA, complemented with fixed cameras on the sea bottom and by a set of video cameras mounted on the AUV. The objectives of the study were: 1) to characterize the EMF emission levels associated with submarine cables 2) to monitor potential responses of aquatic animals to the emissions and 3) to develop an associated database of field observations. As control, observations of EMF levels and in situ marine species were conducted with power in the cable turned off. Good quality measurements of EMF emissions were obtained using the mobile AUV platform and the data from the surveys were used to develop contour maps of the EMF levels in the water column above the live cable as well as to provide information about how the field decays away from the cable. The measurements show good agreement with theoretical models of the how EMF levels decay away from the cable in deep and shallow water environment. Electric fields in excess of 200µV/m were measured in the vicinity of the cable during the power on state. Quarterly surveys by SCUBA divers were conducted, using point and transect count methods, over a period of one year at three locations, one at a shallow site where the water depth is approximately 5m, and the other at the Barracuda Reef where the water depth is approximately 10m. The sampling results were analyzed to determine if the presence of an SFOMF generated EMF alters: (1) abundance, species richness, and assemblage structure of coral reef fishes, (2) the behavior of fishes including elasmobranchs, and (3) the distribution of marine turtles and mammals. Diver observations were also used in attempt to discern if there were any noticeable organismal responses during the transitional period between ambient OFF to energized AC or DC power states, and video footage was intended to augment the in-situ visual survey data and aid in interpretation of the results. Comparisons are provided between observation datasets between the three sites and between the point and transect count methods. Presence of several individual elasmobranch species, including sharks and stingrays, were recorded during the surveys. No apparent effect on richness could be discerned between the power on and off states. No apparent sudden animal movements were observed during transitions between power states.},
doi = {10.2172/1357262},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Sep 29 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Thu Sep 29 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

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