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Title: WARP

Abstract

WARP, which can stand for ``Weaving All the Random Particles,'' is a three-dimensional (3D) continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code developed at UC Berkeley to efficiently execute on NVIDIA graphics processing unit (GPU) platforms. WARP accelerates Monte Carlo simulations while preserving the benefits of using the Monte Carlo method, namely, that very few physical and geometrical simplifications are applied. WARP is able to calculate multiplication factors, neutron flux distributions (in both space and energy), and fission source distributions for time-independent neutron transport problems. It can run in both criticality or fixed source modes, but fixed source mode is currently not robust, optimized, or maintained in the newest version. WARP can transport neutrons in unrestricted arrangements of parallelepipeds, hexagonal prisms, cylinders, and spheres. The goal of developing WARP is to investigate algorithms that can grow into a full-featured, continuous energy, Monte Carlo neutron transport code that is accelerated by running on GPUs. The crux of the effort is to make Monte Carlo calculations faster while producing accurate results. Modern supercomputers are commonly being built with GPU coprocessor cards in their nodes to increase their computational efficiency and performance. GPUs execute efficiently on data-parallel problems, but most CPU codes, including thosemore » for Monte Carlo neutral particle transport, are predominantly task-parallel. WARP uses a data-parallel neutron transport algorithm to take advantage of the computing power GPUs offer.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. University of California - Berkeley
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
Contributing Org.:
University of California - Berkeley
OSTI Identifier:
1357227
Report Number(s):
WARP; 005219WKSTN00
DOE Contract Number:  
NA0000979
Resource Type:
Software
Software Revision:
00
Software Package Number:
005219
Software CPU:
WKSTN
Open Source:
Yes
https://github.com/weft
Source Code Available:
Yes
Other Software Info:
Publications: doi:10.1016/j.anucene.2014.10.039 doi:10.1016/j.anucene.2017.01.027
Related Software:
CUB, moderngpu
Country of Publication:
United States

Citation Formats

Bergmann, Ryan M., and Rowland, Kelly L. WARP. Computer software. https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1357227. Vers. 00. USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). 12 Apr. 2017. Web.
Bergmann, Ryan M., & Rowland, Kelly L. (2017, April 12). WARP (Version 00) [Computer software]. https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1357227.
Bergmann, Ryan M., and Rowland, Kelly L. WARP. Computer software. Version 00. April 12, 2017. https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1357227.
@misc{osti_1357227,
title = {WARP, Version 00},
author = {Bergmann, Ryan M. and Rowland, Kelly L.},
abstractNote = {WARP, which can stand for ``Weaving All the Random Particles,'' is a three-dimensional (3D) continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code developed at UC Berkeley to efficiently execute on NVIDIA graphics processing unit (GPU) platforms. WARP accelerates Monte Carlo simulations while preserving the benefits of using the Monte Carlo method, namely, that very few physical and geometrical simplifications are applied. WARP is able to calculate multiplication factors, neutron flux distributions (in both space and energy), and fission source distributions for time-independent neutron transport problems. It can run in both criticality or fixed source modes, but fixed source mode is currently not robust, optimized, or maintained in the newest version. WARP can transport neutrons in unrestricted arrangements of parallelepipeds, hexagonal prisms, cylinders, and spheres. The goal of developing WARP is to investigate algorithms that can grow into a full-featured, continuous energy, Monte Carlo neutron transport code that is accelerated by running on GPUs. The crux of the effort is to make Monte Carlo calculations faster while producing accurate results. Modern supercomputers are commonly being built with GPU coprocessor cards in their nodes to increase their computational efficiency and performance. GPUs execute efficiently on data-parallel problems, but most CPU codes, including those for Monte Carlo neutral particle transport, are predominantly task-parallel. WARP uses a data-parallel neutron transport algorithm to take advantage of the computing power GPUs offer.},
url = {https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1357227},
doi = {},
year = {Wed Apr 12 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Apr 12 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
note =
}

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