skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Damage-tolerant metallic composites via melt infiltration of additively manufactured preforms

Abstract

A facile two-step approach for 3D printing metal-metal composites with precisely controlled microstructures is described. Composites made with this approach exhibit tailorable thermal and mechanical properties as well as exceptional damage tolerance.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [5];  [5];  [4];  [6]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Fuels, Engines and Emissions Research Center (FEERC); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Bredesen Center
  2. Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and NanoEngineering; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  3. Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and NanoEngineering
  4. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science & Technology Division
  5. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  6. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Fuels, Engines and Emissions Research Center (FEERC)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V); USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Advanced Manufacturing Office (EE-5A)
OSTI Identifier:
1356915
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1419103
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Materials & Design
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 127; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0264-1275
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Additive manufacturing; Composites; Microstructure design; Infiltration; Damage-tolerance

Citation Formats

Pawlowski, Alexander E., Cordero, Zachary C., French, Matthew R., Muth, Thomas R., Keith Carver, J., Dinwiddie, Ralph B., Elliott, Amelia M., Shyam, Amit, and Splitter, Derek A. Damage-tolerant metallic composites via melt infiltration of additively manufactured preforms. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.matdes.2017.04.072.
Pawlowski, Alexander E., Cordero, Zachary C., French, Matthew R., Muth, Thomas R., Keith Carver, J., Dinwiddie, Ralph B., Elliott, Amelia M., Shyam, Amit, & Splitter, Derek A. Damage-tolerant metallic composites via melt infiltration of additively manufactured preforms. United States. doi:10.1016/j.matdes.2017.04.072.
Pawlowski, Alexander E., Cordero, Zachary C., French, Matthew R., Muth, Thomas R., Keith Carver, J., Dinwiddie, Ralph B., Elliott, Amelia M., Shyam, Amit, and Splitter, Derek A. Sat . "Damage-tolerant metallic composites via melt infiltration of additively manufactured preforms". United States. doi:10.1016/j.matdes.2017.04.072. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1356915.
@article{osti_1356915,
title = {Damage-tolerant metallic composites via melt infiltration of additively manufactured preforms},
author = {Pawlowski, Alexander E. and Cordero, Zachary C. and French, Matthew R. and Muth, Thomas R. and Keith Carver, J. and Dinwiddie, Ralph B. and Elliott, Amelia M. and Shyam, Amit and Splitter, Derek A.},
abstractNote = {A facile two-step approach for 3D printing metal-metal composites with precisely controlled microstructures is described. Composites made with this approach exhibit tailorable thermal and mechanical properties as well as exceptional damage tolerance.},
doi = {10.1016/j.matdes.2017.04.072},
journal = {Materials & Design},
number = C,
volume = 127,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 22 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 22 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share:
  • The development and production of SiC-whisker-reinforced metal-matrix composites (MMCs) has gained significant attention due to the usefulness of such materials in the automotive and aerospace industries. Ceramic materials in general possess a high elastic modulus, low relative weight, high hardness, and excellent high-temperature corrosion resistance. Because of these properties, ceramics can be combined with lightweight aluminum via squeeze casting to fabricate a low-cost MMC part. To fabricate reproducible and reliable MMC parts, consistent SiC-whisker preforms must first be produced.
  • Gas transport via pressure-driven permeation or via concentration-driven diffusion is a key step in the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process. This paper describes methods for the measurement of these properties for CVI preforms and partially infiltrated composites. Results are presented for Nicalon-fiber cloth layup preforms and composites, Nextel-fiber braid preforms and composites, and a Nicalon-fiber three-dimensional (3-D) weave composite. The permeability of Nicalon cloth layup preforms is strongly dependent on the packing density over the range of 29--40 vol% but is only weakly dependent on the orientation of the alternating cloth layers. The permeability of Nextel braid preforms is dependentmore » on the thread count and the weight for cloths with similar construction and packing density. The gas permeability of the finer wave (6.3 tows/cm (16 tows/in.)) is approximately one-half that of the coarser weave (3.5 tows/cm (9 tows/in.)). Results are reported for a small number of infiltrated composites with Nextel fiber reinforcement. Attempts to mount a Nicalon-fiber 3-D weave preform specimen have been unsuccessful. Results for a small number of composite specimens with 3-D weave reinforcement are reported.« less
  • Alumina matrix composites have been grown by directed melt oxidation of an Al-Si-Zn-Mg alloy into sintered SiC preforms. Reaction between melt and the silica layer on the pre-oxidized SiC yields a matrix in which the residual alloy is principally silicon. However, there is no evidence of the formation of Al[sub 4]C[sub 3]. The coarsest particles display the least reaction while porosity increases as the particle size decreases. Thus, owing to the enrichment of silicon, growth rates are retarded compared to those in free space. The microstructure of the oxide is monocrystalline over distances of the order of the inter-particle spacing,more » however, a new type of growth fault that constitutes an inversion boundary in the Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], has been found. Owing to the substantial reaction between the particle and the melt, the volume fraction of the alloy constituent in the final composite depends sensitively on particle size, in contrast to its relative invariance in directed melt oxidation into inert preforms.« less