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Title: Efficiency analysis of semi-open sorption heat pump systems

Abstract

Sorption systems traditionally fall into two categories: closed (heat pumps and chillers) and open (dehumidification). Recent work has explored the possibility of semi-open systems, which can perform heat pumping or chilling while utilizing ambient humidity as the working fluid of the cycle, and are still capable of being driven by solar, waste, or combustion heat sources. The efficiencies of closed and open systems are well characterized, and can typically be determined from four temperature s. In this work, the performance potential of semi-open systems is explored by adapting expressions for the efficiency of closed and open systems to the novel semi-open systems. A key new parameter is introduced, which involves five temperatures, since both the ambient dry bulb and ambient dew point are used. Furthermore, this additional temperature is necessary to capture the open absorber performance in terms of both the absorption of humidity and sensible heat transfer with surrounding air.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [1];  [2]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  2. Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Building Technologies Research and Integration Center (BTRIC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Building Technologies Office (EE-5B)
OSTI Identifier:
1356886
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Renewable Energy
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 110; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0960-1481
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; sorption; absorption; semi-open; efficiency; novel cycle

Citation Formats

Gluesenkamp, Kyle R., Chugh, Devesh, Abdelaziz, Omar, and Moghaddam, Saeed. Efficiency analysis of semi-open sorption heat pump systems. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.renene.2016.07.075.
Gluesenkamp, Kyle R., Chugh, Devesh, Abdelaziz, Omar, & Moghaddam, Saeed. Efficiency analysis of semi-open sorption heat pump systems. United States. doi:10.1016/j.renene.2016.07.075.
Gluesenkamp, Kyle R., Chugh, Devesh, Abdelaziz, Omar, and Moghaddam, Saeed. 2016. "Efficiency analysis of semi-open sorption heat pump systems". United States. doi:10.1016/j.renene.2016.07.075. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1356886.
@article{osti_1356886,
title = {Efficiency analysis of semi-open sorption heat pump systems},
author = {Gluesenkamp, Kyle R. and Chugh, Devesh and Abdelaziz, Omar and Moghaddam, Saeed},
abstractNote = {Sorption systems traditionally fall into two categories: closed (heat pumps and chillers) and open (dehumidification). Recent work has explored the possibility of semi-open systems, which can perform heat pumping or chilling while utilizing ambient humidity as the working fluid of the cycle, and are still capable of being driven by solar, waste, or combustion heat sources. The efficiencies of closed and open systems are well characterized, and can typically be determined from four temperature s. In this work, the performance potential of semi-open systems is explored by adapting expressions for the efficiency of closed and open systems to the novel semi-open systems. A key new parameter is introduced, which involves five temperatures, since both the ambient dry bulb and ambient dew point are used. Furthermore, this additional temperature is necessary to capture the open absorber performance in terms of both the absorption of humidity and sensible heat transfer with surrounding air.},
doi = {10.1016/j.renene.2016.07.075},
journal = {Renewable Energy},
number = C,
volume = 110,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
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