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Title: Policy Enabling Environment for Corporate Renewable Energy Sourcing

Abstract

Interest in renewable energy (RE) procurement in new markets is on the rise. Corporations are increasing their commitments to procuring RE, motivated by an interest in using clean energy sources and reducing their energy expenses. Many large companies have facilities and supply chains in multiple countries, and are interested in procuring renewable energy in the grids where they use energy. The policy environment around the world plays a key role in shaping where and how corporations will invest in renewables. This fact sheet details findings from a recent 21st Century Power Partnership report, Policies to Enable Corporate Renewable Energy Sourcing Internationally.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of International Affairs (PI)
OSTI Identifier:
1356878
Report Number(s):
NREL/FS-6A50-68151
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; policy; international energy policy; renewable energy; corporate sourcing; electricity demand growth; 21st Century Power Partnership

Citation Formats

. Policy Enabling Environment for Corporate Renewable Energy Sourcing. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
. Policy Enabling Environment for Corporate Renewable Energy Sourcing. United States.
. Tue . "Policy Enabling Environment for Corporate Renewable Energy Sourcing". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1356878.
@article{osti_1356878,
title = {Policy Enabling Environment for Corporate Renewable Energy Sourcing},
author = {},
abstractNote = {Interest in renewable energy (RE) procurement in new markets is on the rise. Corporations are increasing their commitments to procuring RE, motivated by an interest in using clean energy sources and reducing their energy expenses. Many large companies have facilities and supply chains in multiple countries, and are interested in procuring renewable energy in the grids where they use energy. The policy environment around the world plays a key role in shaping where and how corporations will invest in renewables. This fact sheet details findings from a recent 21st Century Power Partnership report, Policies to Enable Corporate Renewable Energy Sourcing Internationally.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 09 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue May 09 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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