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Title: Strength and viscosity effects on perturbed shock front stability in metals

Abstract

Here, computational modeling and experimental measurements on metal samples subject to a laser-driven, ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability showed differences between viscosity and strength effects. In particular, numerical and analytical solutions, coupled with measurements of fed-through perturbations, generated by perturbed shock fronts onto initially flat surfaces, show promise as a validation method for models of deviatoric response in the post shocked material. Analysis shows that measurements of shock perturbation amplitudes at low sample thickness-to-wavelength ratios are not enough to differentiate between strength and viscosity effects, but that surface displacement data of the fed-through fed-thru perturbations appears to resolve the ambiguity. Additionally, analytical and numerical results show shock front perturbation evolution dependence on initial perturbation amplitude and wavelength is significantly different in viscous and materials with strength, suggesting simple experimental geometry changes should provide data supporting one model or the other.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)
  2. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) (SC-24); USDOE Office of Science (SC). Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) (SC-24)
OSTI Identifier:
1356634
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-27117
Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9007; PRLTAO; TRN: US1702730
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0008683; AC52-06NA25396; NA0002005
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physical Review Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 118; Journal Issue: 19; Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9007
Publisher:
American Physical Society (APS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; shocks; hydrodynamic instabilities; strength; viscosity

Citation Formats

Opie, Saul, Loomis, Eric Nicholas, Peralta, Pedro, Shimada, Tsutomu, and Johnson, Randall Philip. Strength and viscosity effects on perturbed shock front stability in metals. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.195501.
Opie, Saul, Loomis, Eric Nicholas, Peralta, Pedro, Shimada, Tsutomu, & Johnson, Randall Philip. Strength and viscosity effects on perturbed shock front stability in metals. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.195501.
Opie, Saul, Loomis, Eric Nicholas, Peralta, Pedro, Shimada, Tsutomu, and Johnson, Randall Philip. 2017. "Strength and viscosity effects on perturbed shock front stability in metals". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.195501.
@article{osti_1356634,
title = {Strength and viscosity effects on perturbed shock front stability in metals},
author = {Opie, Saul and Loomis, Eric Nicholas and Peralta, Pedro and Shimada, Tsutomu and Johnson, Randall Philip},
abstractNote = {Here, computational modeling and experimental measurements on metal samples subject to a laser-driven, ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability showed differences between viscosity and strength effects. In particular, numerical and analytical solutions, coupled with measurements of fed-through perturbations, generated by perturbed shock fronts onto initially flat surfaces, show promise as a validation method for models of deviatoric response in the post shocked material. Analysis shows that measurements of shock perturbation amplitudes at low sample thickness-to-wavelength ratios are not enough to differentiate between strength and viscosity effects, but that surface displacement data of the fed-through fed-thru perturbations appears to resolve the ambiguity. Additionally, analytical and numerical results show shock front perturbation evolution dependence on initial perturbation amplitude and wavelength is significantly different in viscous and materials with strength, suggesting simple experimental geometry changes should provide data supporting one model or the other.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.195501},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
number = 19,
volume = 118,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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