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Title: Maintenance and Testing of Fume Cupboard

Abstract

Scientists at universities across Iraq are actively working to report actual incidents and accidents occurring in their laboratories, as well as structural improvements made to improve safety and security, to raise awareness and encourage openness, leading to widespread adoption of robust Chemical Safety and Security (CSS) practices. This manuscript highlights the importance of periodic maintenance on fume cupboards, and is the fourth in a series of five case studies describing laboratory incidents, accidents, and laboratory improvements. In this study, we describe a situation in which the ventilation capacity of the fume cupboard in the undergraduate chemistry laboratories at Al-Nahrain University had decreased to an unacceptable level. The CSS Committee investigated and found the ducting system had been blocked by plastic sheets and dead birds. All the ducts have since been cleaned, and four extra ventilation fans have been installed to further increase ventilation capacity. By openly sharing what happened along with the lessons learned from the accident, we hope to minimize the possibility of another researcher being injured in a similar incident in the future.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1356513
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-118915
Journal ID: ISSN 2162-5999; 400809000
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Open Journal of Safety Science and Technology; Journal Volume: 07; Journal Issue: 01
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
fume cupboard maintenance; scientific practical skills; chemistry laboratory

Citation Formats

Hussein, Falah H., Al-Dahhan, Wedad H., Al-Zuhairi, Ali Jassim, Rodda, Kabrena E., and Yousif, Emad. Maintenance and Testing of Fume Cupboard. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.4236/ojsst.2017.71006.
Hussein, Falah H., Al-Dahhan, Wedad H., Al-Zuhairi, Ali Jassim, Rodda, Kabrena E., & Yousif, Emad. Maintenance and Testing of Fume Cupboard. United States. doi:10.4236/ojsst.2017.71006.
Hussein, Falah H., Al-Dahhan, Wedad H., Al-Zuhairi, Ali Jassim, Rodda, Kabrena E., and Yousif, Emad. Sun . "Maintenance and Testing of Fume Cupboard". United States. doi:10.4236/ojsst.2017.71006.
@article{osti_1356513,
title = {Maintenance and Testing of Fume Cupboard},
author = {Hussein, Falah H. and Al-Dahhan, Wedad H. and Al-Zuhairi, Ali Jassim and Rodda, Kabrena E. and Yousif, Emad},
abstractNote = {Scientists at universities across Iraq are actively working to report actual incidents and accidents occurring in their laboratories, as well as structural improvements made to improve safety and security, to raise awareness and encourage openness, leading to widespread adoption of robust Chemical Safety and Security (CSS) practices. This manuscript highlights the importance of periodic maintenance on fume cupboards, and is the fourth in a series of five case studies describing laboratory incidents, accidents, and laboratory improvements. In this study, we describe a situation in which the ventilation capacity of the fume cupboard in the undergraduate chemistry laboratories at Al-Nahrain University had decreased to an unacceptable level. The CSS Committee investigated and found the ducting system had been blocked by plastic sheets and dead birds. All the ducts have since been cleaned, and four extra ventilation fans have been installed to further increase ventilation capacity. By openly sharing what happened along with the lessons learned from the accident, we hope to minimize the possibility of another researcher being injured in a similar incident in the future.},
doi = {10.4236/ojsst.2017.71006},
journal = {Open Journal of Safety Science and Technology},
number = 01,
volume = 07,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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