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Title: Oxidation potentials of phenols and anilines: correlation analysis of electrochemical and theoretical values

Abstract

As described in the main text, we classified our voltammograms into four types. For phenols, most compounds were type I or type II, except four phenols that were type III (4-nitrophenol, 4-cyanophenol, DNOC, and 4-hydroxyacetphenone); and two phenols that were type IV (4-aminophenol and dopamine). Almost all of the compounds gave the same type by SCV and SWV, except for 2,4-dinitrophenol (whose current went up and down and therefore could be considered a type II or III), 4-cyanophenol (which fell into a type III for SCV, but whose current went up and down in SWV (type II or III)), and 4-hydroxyacetophenone (which was a type III in SCV, but a type II in SWV). The majority of the anilines were type I except for p-toluidine (type II) and 4-methyl-3-nitroaniline and 2-methoxy-5-nitroaniline (both were type I for SWV, but for SCV fell into type III and type II respectively).

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Oregon Health & Science Univ., Portland, OR (United States). Inst. of Environmental Health
  2. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23); National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1356492
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-123390
Journal ID: ISSN 2050-7887; 49691; KP1704020
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830; ER-1735; 1506744
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 19; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 2050-7887
Publisher:
Royal Society of Chemistry
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Pavitt, Ania S., Bylaska, Eric J., and Tratnyek, Paul G. Oxidation potentials of phenols and anilines: correlation analysis of electrochemical and theoretical values. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1039/C6EM00694A.
Pavitt, Ania S., Bylaska, Eric J., & Tratnyek, Paul G. Oxidation potentials of phenols and anilines: correlation analysis of electrochemical and theoretical values. United States. doi:10.1039/C6EM00694A.
Pavitt, Ania S., Bylaska, Eric J., and Tratnyek, Paul G. Fri . "Oxidation potentials of phenols and anilines: correlation analysis of electrochemical and theoretical values". United States. doi:10.1039/C6EM00694A. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1356492.
@article{osti_1356492,
title = {Oxidation potentials of phenols and anilines: correlation analysis of electrochemical and theoretical values},
author = {Pavitt, Ania S. and Bylaska, Eric J. and Tratnyek, Paul G.},
abstractNote = {As described in the main text, we classified our voltammograms into four types. For phenols, most compounds were type I or type II, except four phenols that were type III (4-nitrophenol, 4-cyanophenol, DNOC, and 4-hydroxyacetphenone); and two phenols that were type IV (4-aminophenol and dopamine). Almost all of the compounds gave the same type by SCV and SWV, except for 2,4-dinitrophenol (whose current went up and down and therefore could be considered a type II or III), 4-cyanophenol (which fell into a type III for SCV, but whose current went up and down in SWV (type II or III)), and 4-hydroxyacetophenone (which was a type III in SCV, but a type II in SWV). The majority of the anilines were type I except for p-toluidine (type II) and 4-methyl-3-nitroaniline and 2-methoxy-5-nitroaniline (both were type I for SWV, but for SCV fell into type III and type II respectively).},
doi = {10.1039/C6EM00694A},
journal = {Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts},
number = 3,
volume = 19,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 10 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Feb 10 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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  • A new enzymatic method has been developed for the removal of phenols and anilines from industrial waste waters. This involves the treatment of aqueous solutions containing the pollutants with horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide. Such treatment results in precipitation of phenols and aromatic amines from water as a result of their enzymatic crosslinking. This approach was used to remove over 30 different phenols and aromatic amines from water. The effect of reaction conditions on the enzymatic removal of the pollutants was studied. For some pollutants, the efficiency of the enzymatic removal is very high (exceeding 99%), whereas for others itmore » is significantly lower. The presence of easily removed phenols and aromatic amines greatly enhances the enzymatic precipitation of those that have low removal efficiencies.« less
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