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Title: Interfacial rheology of coexisting solid and fluid monolayers

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ORCiD logo
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
FOREIGN
OSTI Identifier:
1356420
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Soft Matter; Journal Volume: 13; Journal Issue: 7
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Sachan, A. K., Choi, S. Q., Kim, K. H., Tang, Q., Hwang, L., Lee, K. Y. C., Squires, T. M., and Zasadzinski, J. A. Interfacial rheology of coexisting solid and fluid monolayers. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1039/C6SM02797K.
Sachan, A. K., Choi, S. Q., Kim, K. H., Tang, Q., Hwang, L., Lee, K. Y. C., Squires, T. M., & Zasadzinski, J. A. Interfacial rheology of coexisting solid and fluid monolayers. United States. doi:10.1039/C6SM02797K.
Sachan, A. K., Choi, S. Q., Kim, K. H., Tang, Q., Hwang, L., Lee, K. Y. C., Squires, T. M., and Zasadzinski, J. A. Sun . "Interfacial rheology of coexisting solid and fluid monolayers". United States. doi:10.1039/C6SM02797K.
@article{osti_1356420,
title = {Interfacial rheology of coexisting solid and fluid monolayers},
author = {Sachan, A. K. and Choi, S. Q. and Kim, K. H. and Tang, Q. and Hwang, L. and Lee, K. Y. C. and Squires, T. M. and Zasadzinski, J. A.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1039/C6SM02797K},
journal = {Soft Matter},
number = 7,
volume = 13,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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