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Title: Final Report Collaborative Project: Improving the Representation of Coastal and Estuarine Processes in Earth System Models

Abstract

This project aimed to improve long term global climate simulations by resolving and enhancing the representation of the processes involved in the cycling of freshwater through estuaries and coastal regions. This was a collaborative multi-institution project consisting of physical oceanographers, climate model developers, and computational scientists. It specifically targeted the DOE objectives of advancing simulation and predictive capability of climate models through improvements in resolution and physical process representation.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1356337
Report Number(s):
DOE-UCONN-SC0006814-1
DOE Contract Number:
SC0006814
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Tseng, Y.H., Bryan, F.O. and Whitney, M.M., 2016. Impacts of the representation of riverine freshwater input in the community earth system model. Ocean Modelling, 105, pp.71-86.Sun, Q., Whitney, M.M., Bryan, F.O. and Tseng, Y.H., 2017. A box model for representing estuarine physical processes in Earth system models. Ocean Modelling, 112, pp.139-153.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES; 97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; ocean; estuary; river; salinity; earth system model

Citation Formats

Bryan, Frank, Dennis, John, MacCready, Parker, and Whitney, Michael M. Final Report Collaborative Project: Improving the Representation of Coastal and Estuarine Processes in Earth System Models. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1356337.
Bryan, Frank, Dennis, John, MacCready, Parker, & Whitney, Michael M. Final Report Collaborative Project: Improving the Representation of Coastal and Estuarine Processes in Earth System Models. United States. doi:10.2172/1356337.
Bryan, Frank, Dennis, John, MacCready, Parker, and Whitney, Michael M. Fri . "Final Report Collaborative Project: Improving the Representation of Coastal and Estuarine Processes in Earth System Models". United States. doi:10.2172/1356337. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1356337.
@article{osti_1356337,
title = {Final Report Collaborative Project: Improving the Representation of Coastal and Estuarine Processes in Earth System Models},
author = {Bryan, Frank and Dennis, John and MacCready, Parker and Whitney, Michael M.},
abstractNote = {This project aimed to improve long term global climate simulations by resolving and enhancing the representation of the processes involved in the cycling of freshwater through estuaries and coastal regions. This was a collaborative multi-institution project consisting of physical oceanographers, climate model developers, and computational scientists. It specifically targeted the DOE objectives of advancing simulation and predictive capability of climate models through improvements in resolution and physical process representation.},
doi = {10.2172/1356337},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Sep 30 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Sep 30 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Technical Report:

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  • This project aimed to improve long term global climate simulations by resolving and enhancing the representation of the processes involved in the cycling of freshwater through estuaries and coastal regions. This was a collaborative multi-institution project consisting of physical oceanographers, climate model developers, and computational scientists. It specifically targeted the DOE objectives of advancing simulation and predictive capability of climate models through improvements in resolution and physical process representation. The main computational objectives were: 1. To develop computationally efficient, but physically based, parameterizations of estuary and continental shelf mixing processes for use in an Earth System Model (CESM). 2. Tomore » develop a two-way nested regional modeling framework in order to dynamically downscale the climate response of particular coastal ocean regions and to upscale the impact of the regional coastal processes to the global climate in an Earth System Model (CESM). 3. To develop computational infrastructure to enhance the efficiency of data transfer between specific sources and destinations, i.e., a point-to-point communication capability, (used in objective 1) within POP, the ocean component of CESM.« less
  • This project aimed to improve long term global climate simulations by resolving and enhancing the representation of the processes involved in the cycling of freshwater through estuaries and coastal regions. This was a collaborative multi-institution project consisting of physical oceanographers, climate model developers, and computational scientists. It specifically targeted the DOE objectives of advancing simulation and predictive capability of climate models through improvements in resolution and physical process representation.
  • The focus of this grant was on diagnosing the physical mechanisms controlling upper ocean water mass formation and carbon distribution in Earth System Models (ESMs), with the goal of improving the physics that controls their formation.
  • Many of the scientific and societal challenges in understanding and preparing for global environmental change rest upon our ability to understand and predict the water cycle change at large river basin, continent, and global scales. However, current large-scale models, such as the land components of Earth System Models (ESMs), do not yet represent the terrestrial water cycle in a fully integrated manner or resolve the finer-scale processes that can dominate large-scale water budgets. This paper reviews the current representation of hydrologic processes in ESMs and identifies the key opportunities for improvement. This review suggests that (1) the development of ESMsmore » has not kept pace with modeling advances in hydrology, both through neglecting key processes (e.g., groundwater) and neglecting key aspects of spatial variability and hydrologic connectivity; and (2) many modeling advances in hydrology can readily be incorporated into ESMs and substantially improve predictions of the water cycle. Accelerating modeling advances in ESMs requires comprehensive hydrologic benchmarking activities, in order to systematically evaluate competing modeling alternatives, understand model weaknesses, and prioritize model development needs. This demands stronger collaboration, both through greater engagement of hydrologists in ESM development and through more detailed evaluation of ESM processes in research watersheds. Advances in the representation of hydrologic process in ESMs can substantially improve energy, carbon and nutrient cycle prediction capabilities through the fundamental role the water cycle plays in regulating these cycles.« less
  • Main results are summarized for work in these areas: spectrally-invariant approximation within atmospheric radiative transfer; spectral invariance of single scattering albedo for water droplets and ice crystals at weakly absorbing wavelengths; seasonal changes in leaf area of Amazon forests from leaf flushing and abscission; and Cloud droplet size and liquid water path retrievals from zenith radiance measurements.