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Title: Quality Assurance Framework for Mini-Grids

Abstract

To address the root challenges of providing quality power to remote consumers through financially viable mini-grids, the Global Lighting and Energy Access Partnership (Global LEAP) initiative of the Clean Energy Ministerial and the U.S. Department of Energy teamed with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Power Africa to develop a Quality Assurance Framework (QAF) for isolated mini-grids. The framework addresses both alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) mini-grids, and is applicable to renewable, fossil-fuel, and hybrid systems.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
U.S. Department of State
OSTI Identifier:
1356282
Report Number(s):
NREL/PR-7A40-68414
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; mini-grid; standards; quality assurance framework; microgrid; energy access

Citation Formats

Esterly, Sean, Baring-Gould, Ian, and Booth, Samuel. Quality Assurance Framework for Mini-Grids. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Esterly, Sean, Baring-Gould, Ian, & Booth, Samuel. Quality Assurance Framework for Mini-Grids. United States.
Esterly, Sean, Baring-Gould, Ian, and Booth, Samuel. 2017. "Quality Assurance Framework for Mini-Grids". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1356282.
@article{osti_1356282,
title = {Quality Assurance Framework for Mini-Grids},
author = {Esterly, Sean and Baring-Gould, Ian and Booth, Samuel},
abstractNote = {To address the root challenges of providing quality power to remote consumers through financially viable mini-grids, the Global Lighting and Energy Access Partnership (Global LEAP) initiative of the Clean Energy Ministerial and the U.S. Department of Energy teamed with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Power Africa to develop a Quality Assurance Framework (QAF) for isolated mini-grids. The framework addresses both alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) mini-grids, and is applicable to renewable, fossil-fuel, and hybrid systems.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

Conference:
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