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Title: Shaping the spectrum of random-phase radar waveforms

Abstract

The various technologies presented herein relate to generation of a desired waveform profile in the form of a spectrum of apparently random noise (e.g., white noise or colored noise), but with precise spectral characteristics. Hence, a waveform profile that could be readily determined (e.g., by a spoofing system) is effectively obscured. Obscuration is achieved by dividing the waveform into a series of chips, each with an assigned frequency, wherein the sequence of chips are subsequently randomized. Randomization can be a function of the application of a key to the chip sequence. During processing of the echo pulse, a copy of the randomized transmitted pulse is recovered or regenerated against which the received echo is correlated. Hence, with the echo energy range-compressed in this manner, it is possible to generate a radar image with precise impulse response.

Inventors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1356230
Patent Number(s):
9,645,228
Application Number:
14/102,928
Assignee:
Sandia Corporation SNL-A
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Patent
Resource Relation:
Patent File Date: 2013 Dec 11
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION

Citation Formats

Doerry, Armin W., and Marquette, Brandeis. Shaping the spectrum of random-phase radar waveforms. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Doerry, Armin W., & Marquette, Brandeis. Shaping the spectrum of random-phase radar waveforms. United States.
Doerry, Armin W., and Marquette, Brandeis. 2017. "Shaping the spectrum of random-phase radar waveforms". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1356230.
@article{osti_1356230,
title = {Shaping the spectrum of random-phase radar waveforms},
author = {Doerry, Armin W. and Marquette, Brandeis},
abstractNote = {The various technologies presented herein relate to generation of a desired waveform profile in the form of a spectrum of apparently random noise (e.g., white noise or colored noise), but with precise spectral characteristics. Hence, a waveform profile that could be readily determined (e.g., by a spoofing system) is effectively obscured. Obscuration is achieved by dividing the waveform into a series of chips, each with an assigned frequency, wherein the sequence of chips are subsequently randomized. Randomization can be a function of the application of a key to the chip sequence. During processing of the echo pulse, a copy of the randomized transmitted pulse is recovered or regenerated against which the received echo is correlated. Hence, with the echo energy range-compressed in this manner, it is possible to generate a radar image with precise impulse response.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

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