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Title: Characterization of chemical contaminants and their spectral properties from an atmospheric pressure ns-pulsed microdischarge in neon

Abstract

Portable applications of microdischarges will mandate operation in the presence of contaminant species. This paper examines the temporal evolution of microdischarge optical and ultraviolet emissions during pulsed operation by experimental methods. By varying the pulse length of a microdischarge initiated in a 4-­hole silicon microcavity array operating in a 655 Torr ambient primarily composed of Ne, we were able to measure the emission growth rates for different contaminant species native to the discharge environment as a function of pulse length. It was found that emission from hydrogen and oxygen impurities demonstrated similar rates of change, while emissions from molecular and atomic nitrogen, measured at 337.1 and 120 nm’s respectively, exhibited the lowest rate of change. We conclude that it is likely that O 2 undergoes the same resonant energy transfer process between rare gas excimers that has been shown for H 2. Further, efficient resonant processes were found to be favored during ignition and extinction phases of the pulse, while emission at the 337.1 nm line from N 2 was favored during the intermediate stage of the plasma. In addition to experimental results, a zero-­dimensional analysis is also presented to further understand the nature of the microdischarge.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  2. Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1356220
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1349535
Report Number(s):
SAND-2016-9770J
Journal ID: ISSN 1070-664X; 647882
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physics of Plasmas
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 24; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 1070-664X
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Sillerud, Colin H., Schwindt, Peter D. D., Moorman, Mathew, Yee, B. T., Anderson, John, Pfeifer, Nathaniel B., Hedberg, E. L., and Manginell, Ronald P. Characterization of chemical contaminants and their spectral properties from an atmospheric pressure ns-pulsed microdischarge in neon. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4977448.
Sillerud, Colin H., Schwindt, Peter D. D., Moorman, Mathew, Yee, B. T., Anderson, John, Pfeifer, Nathaniel B., Hedberg, E. L., & Manginell, Ronald P. Characterization of chemical contaminants and their spectral properties from an atmospheric pressure ns-pulsed microdischarge in neon. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4977448.
Sillerud, Colin H., Schwindt, Peter D. D., Moorman, Mathew, Yee, B. T., Anderson, John, Pfeifer, Nathaniel B., Hedberg, E. L., and Manginell, Ronald P. Wed . "Characterization of chemical contaminants and their spectral properties from an atmospheric pressure ns-pulsed microdischarge in neon". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4977448. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1356220.
@article{osti_1356220,
title = {Characterization of chemical contaminants and their spectral properties from an atmospheric pressure ns-pulsed microdischarge in neon},
author = {Sillerud, Colin H. and Schwindt, Peter D. D. and Moorman, Mathew and Yee, B. T. and Anderson, John and Pfeifer, Nathaniel B. and Hedberg, E. L. and Manginell, Ronald P.},
abstractNote = {Portable applications of microdischarges will mandate operation in the presence of contaminant species. This paper examines the temporal evolution of microdischarge optical and ultraviolet emissions during pulsed operation by experimental methods. By varying the pulse length of a microdischarge initiated in a 4-­hole silicon microcavity array operating in a 655 Torr ambient primarily composed of Ne, we were able to measure the emission growth rates for different contaminant species native to the discharge environment as a function of pulse length. It was found that emission from hydrogen and oxygen impurities demonstrated similar rates of change, while emissions from molecular and atomic nitrogen, measured at 337.1 and 120 nm’s respectively, exhibited the lowest rate of change. We conclude that it is likely that O2 undergoes the same resonant energy transfer process between rare gas excimers that has been shown for H2. Further, efficient resonant processes were found to be favored during ignition and extinction phases of the pulse, while emission at the 337.1 nm line from N2 was favored during the intermediate stage of the plasma. In addition to experimental results, a zero-­dimensional analysis is also presented to further understand the nature of the microdischarge.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4977448},
journal = {Physics of Plasmas},
number = 3,
volume = 24,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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