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Title: Why is the Weak Force Weak?

Abstract

The subatomic world is governed by three known forces, each with vastly different energy. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln takes on the weak nuclear force and shows why it is so much weaker than the other known forces.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1356211
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; PARTICLE PHYSICS; WEAK NUCLEAR FORCE; ELECTROMAGNETIC FORCE; ELECTROMAGNETISM; W BOSON; Z BOSON; PHOTON; QUARK; ANTIQUARK

Citation Formats

Lincoln, Don. Why is the Weak Force Weak?. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Lincoln, Don. Why is the Weak Force Weak?. United States.
Lincoln, Don. Fri . "Why is the Weak Force Weak?". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1356211.
@article{osti_1356211,
title = {Why is the Weak Force Weak?},
author = {Lincoln, Don},
abstractNote = {The subatomic world is governed by three known forces, each with vastly different energy. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln takes on the weak nuclear force and shows why it is so much weaker than the other known forces.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Apr 14 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Apr 14 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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