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Title: Sterile Neutrinos and Seesaws

Abstract

Time and again, the study of neutrinos has confounded scientists. One very peculiar property of neutrinos is that only neutrinos with a specific spin configuration have been observed. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln talks about this and lays out the possibility that other types of neutrinos might exist, called right handed or sterile neutrinos.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1356204
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; PARTICLE PHYSICS; NEUTRINOS; FERMIONS; SPIN; STERILE NEUTRINOS; RIGHT HANDED NEUTRINOS; LEFT HANDED NEUTRINOS

Citation Formats

Lincoln, Don. Sterile Neutrinos and Seesaws. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Lincoln, Don. Sterile Neutrinos and Seesaws. United States.
Lincoln, Don. 2017. "Sterile Neutrinos and Seesaws". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1356204.
@article{osti_1356204,
title = {Sterile Neutrinos and Seesaws},
author = {Lincoln, Don},
abstractNote = {Time and again, the study of neutrinos has confounded scientists. One very peculiar property of neutrinos is that only neutrinos with a specific spin configuration have been observed. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln talks about this and lays out the possibility that other types of neutrinos might exist, called right handed or sterile neutrinos.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}
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