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Title: Analysis of Microclad from Several Manufacturing Lots: Summary report

Abstract

The goal of this project is to characterize and document the differences between 4 sets of microclad samples, and provide this information to the detonator Design Agency (Q-6) for the purposes of evaluating “similitude” for stockpile use.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1] more »;  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1] « less
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1356163
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-23722
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Microclad; Fortin; Datex

Citation Formats

Martz, Joseph Christopher, Sintay, Stephen Daniel, Labouriau, Andrea, Judge, Elizabeth, Kelly, Daniel, Dirmyer, Matthew R., Milenski, Helen Marie, Patterson, Brian M., Sandoval, Cynthia Wathen, Usov, Igor Olegovich, Beaux, Miles Frank II, Henderson, Kevin C., Torres, Joseph Angelo, Edwards, Stephanie Lynn, Vodnik, Douglas R., Keller, Jennie, Mccabe, Rodney James, Livescu, Veronica, Cowan, Joseph Sarno, Aragonez, Robert J., Tokash, Justin Charles, Lawrence, Samantha Kay, Leon Brito, Neliza, and Spearing, Dane Robert. Analysis of Microclad from Several Manufacturing Lots: Summary report. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1356163.
Martz, Joseph Christopher, Sintay, Stephen Daniel, Labouriau, Andrea, Judge, Elizabeth, Kelly, Daniel, Dirmyer, Matthew R., Milenski, Helen Marie, Patterson, Brian M., Sandoval, Cynthia Wathen, Usov, Igor Olegovich, Beaux, Miles Frank II, Henderson, Kevin C., Torres, Joseph Angelo, Edwards, Stephanie Lynn, Vodnik, Douglas R., Keller, Jennie, Mccabe, Rodney James, Livescu, Veronica, Cowan, Joseph Sarno, Aragonez, Robert J., Tokash, Justin Charles, Lawrence, Samantha Kay, Leon Brito, Neliza, & Spearing, Dane Robert. Analysis of Microclad from Several Manufacturing Lots: Summary report. United States. doi:10.2172/1356163.
Martz, Joseph Christopher, Sintay, Stephen Daniel, Labouriau, Andrea, Judge, Elizabeth, Kelly, Daniel, Dirmyer, Matthew R., Milenski, Helen Marie, Patterson, Brian M., Sandoval, Cynthia Wathen, Usov, Igor Olegovich, Beaux, Miles Frank II, Henderson, Kevin C., Torres, Joseph Angelo, Edwards, Stephanie Lynn, Vodnik, Douglas R., Keller, Jennie, Mccabe, Rodney James, Livescu, Veronica, Cowan, Joseph Sarno, Aragonez, Robert J., Tokash, Justin Charles, Lawrence, Samantha Kay, Leon Brito, Neliza, and Spearing, Dane Robert. Fri . "Analysis of Microclad from Several Manufacturing Lots: Summary report". United States. doi:10.2172/1356163. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1356163.
@article{osti_1356163,
title = {Analysis of Microclad from Several Manufacturing Lots: Summary report},
author = {Martz, Joseph Christopher and Sintay, Stephen Daniel and Labouriau, Andrea and Judge, Elizabeth and Kelly, Daniel and Dirmyer, Matthew R. and Milenski, Helen Marie and Patterson, Brian M. and Sandoval, Cynthia Wathen and Usov, Igor Olegovich and Beaux, Miles Frank II and Henderson, Kevin C. and Torres, Joseph Angelo and Edwards, Stephanie Lynn and Vodnik, Douglas R. and Keller, Jennie and Mccabe, Rodney James and Livescu, Veronica and Cowan, Joseph Sarno and Aragonez, Robert J. and Tokash, Justin Charles and Lawrence, Samantha Kay and Leon Brito, Neliza and Spearing, Dane Robert},
abstractNote = {The goal of this project is to characterize and document the differences between 4 sets of microclad samples, and provide this information to the detonator Design Agency (Q-6) for the purposes of evaluating “similitude” for stockpile use.},
doi = {10.2172/1356163},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri May 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri May 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Microclad is a composite material consisting of a thin copper coating applied on a single side over a Kapton substrate. Kapton is the commercial designator for polyimide supplied by DuPont. Microclad is a key material in detonator manufacture and function. Detonators which utilize Microclad function when a large current applied through a thin bridge etched into the copper produces a plasma, accelerating a Kapton flyer into an explosive (PETN) pellet. The geometry and properties of the Microclad are a critical element of this process.
  • Initial experiments conducted on thermal barrier coatings prepared in the newly upgraded research plasma spray facility and the burner rig test facilities are discussed. Part 1 discusses experiments which establish the spray parameters for three baseline zirconia-yttria coatings. The quality of five similar coating lots was judged primarily by their response to burner rig exposure supplemented by data from other sources such as specimen characterizations and thermal diffusivity measurements. After allowing for burner rig variability, although there appears to be an optimum density (i.e., optimum microstructure) for maximum burner rig life, the distribution tends to be rather broad about themore » maximum. In Part 2, new hafnia-yttria-based coatings were evaluated against both baseline and alternate zirconia-yttria coatings. The hafnia-yttria coatings and the zirconia-yttria coatings that were prepared by an alternate powder vendor were very sensitive to plasma spray parameters, in that high-quality coatings were only obtained when certain parameters were employed. The reasons for this important observation are not understood. Also not understood is that the first of two replicate specimens sprayed for Part 1 consistently performed better than the second specimen. Subsequent experiments did not display this spray order affect, possibly because a chiller was installed in the torch cooling water circuit. Also, large changes in coating density were observed after switching to a new lot of electrodes. Analyses of these findings were made possible, in part, because of the development of a sensitive density measurement technique described herein in detail. The measured thermal diffusivities did not display the expected strong relationship with porosity. This surprising result was believed to have been caused by increased microcracking of the denser coatings on the stainless steel substrates.« less
  • Sandia has used flyback transformers for many years, primarily to charge capacitors for capacitive discharge units. Important characteristics of the transformer design are to meet inductance, turns ratio, and high voltage breakdown requirements as well as not magnetically saturating during each energy transfer cycle. Sandia has taken over production responsibility for magnetic components from a previous GE/LM, General Electric/Lockheed Martin, facility in Florida that produced {approximately} 50 K units per year. Vanguard Electronics is working with Sandia to transfer many of these designs to Vanguard`s small manufacturing facility in Gardena, CA. The challenge is to achieve the required high reliabilitymore » and meet all the other electrical requirements with such small quantities of parts, {approximately} 100 per year. DOE requirements include high reliability {le} 3 failures per 10,000 components per 20 years while meeting numerous other environmental requirements. The basic design and prove-in required four lots of preproduction parts, extensive environmental testing, and numerous design changes. The manufacturing problems that affected performance of the transformer will be presented. These include encapsulation voids and core alignment. Also, some extended life test data that predicts long term reliability of newly produced transformers versus older designs will be compared.« less
  • Section 5.1 of the approved Waste Handling Plan for Demolition ofthe K-25 and K-2 7 Building Structures and Remaining Components Located at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (WHP) includes two Environmental Management Waste Management (EMWMF) waste lots: (1) Asbestos-contaminated roofing/transite; and (2) Construction debris, such as nonasbestos roofing, structural steel/miscellaneous metal/equipment, nonradiological piping, wood, and miscellaneous small quantities of concrete. This concurrence form adds an additional EMWMF waste lot 6.47 for lavatory sink drains. Based on an analysis of the building structure characterization data, the only individual building structure with either an analytic carcinogenic or Hazard Indexmore » (HI) sum-of-fractions (SOF) greater than 1 is the lavatory sink drains (Table 1). The HI SOF for the lavatory sink drains is 1.34 (Table 2). When all media are combined with the material of construction calculations, the HI SOF is 1.22 (Table 3). However, when the lavatory sink drains are segregated from all other media, the HI SOF is only 0.256, which is well below the EMWMF waste acceptance criteria SOF limit of 1 (Table 4). Given the large volume (124, 625 cubic yards) of other building structure media with a small HI SOF of 0.256 and the small volume (one cubic yard) of lavatory sink drains with a large HI SOF of 1.34, a separate waste lot for lavatory sink drains is recommended. Lead is the primary contributor to the large HI SOF in the lavatory sink drains. Lead in the lavatory sink drains was shown using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test statistically to have higher concentrations than all other building structure media combined. Other analytes having statistically different median concentrations in the lavatory sink drains compared to all other media are antimony, arsenic, boron, cadmium, selenium, solver, vanadium, zinc, mercury, strontium, and Uranium-233/234 (Table 5). A separate waste lot for the lavatory sink drains minimizes the volume weighted sum-of fractions since a much smaller volume of waste will have the higher HI SOF of 1.34, while a much larger volume of waste will have a small HI SOF of 0.256.« less