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Title: Los Alamos and the Neutrino: 60 years of discovery

Abstract

This report provides a historical look at neutrinos and neutrino studies performed at LANL.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1356161
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-24221
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; Atomic and Nuclear Physics; Neutrinos

Citation Formats

Rielage, Keith Robert. Los Alamos and the Neutrino: 60 years of discovery. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1356161.
Rielage, Keith Robert. Los Alamos and the Neutrino: 60 years of discovery. United States. doi:10.2172/1356161.
Rielage, Keith Robert. Mon . "Los Alamos and the Neutrino: 60 years of discovery". United States. doi:10.2172/1356161. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1356161.
@article{osti_1356161,
title = {Los Alamos and the Neutrino: 60 years of discovery},
author = {Rielage, Keith Robert},
abstractNote = {This report provides a historical look at neutrinos and neutrino studies performed at LANL.},
doi = {10.2172/1356161},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 08 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 08 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • A model is presented that relates infrasound signals from underground nuclear tests to the peak vertical velocity at surface-ground-zero. For the most part, agreement between the model and observations is good, the exceptions being events conducted in shallow tuff layers in Yucca Flat. These events all have low values of the peak surface velocity. The authors have determined that the lack of agreement for these events is due to an unusual, second spall event. A stress-wave calculation is presented that reproduces the second-spall phenomenon and indicates that it is due to interference of cavity-rebound-associated signal with the initial ballistic motionmore » of the surface layers. The effect of the rebound signal is to increase the amplitude of the infrasound signal and thus make low velocity events more detectable.« less
  • In May 2000, the Cerro Grande fire burned about 7400 acres of mixed conifer forest on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and much of the 10,000 acres of mountainside draining onto LANL was severely burned. The resulting burned landscapes raised concerns of increased storm runoff and transport of contaminants by runoff in the canyons traversing LANL. The first storms after the fire produced runoff peaks that were more than 200 times greater than prefire levels. Total runoff volume for the year 2000 increased 50% over prefire years, despite a decline in total precipitation of 13% below normal and amore » general decrease in the number of monsoonal thunderstorms. The majority of runoff in 2000 occurred in the canyons at LANL south of Pueblo Canyon (70%), where the highest runoff volume occurred in Water Canyon and the peak discharge occurred in Pajarito Canyon. This report describes the observed effects of the Cerro Grande fire and related environmental impacts to watersheds at and near Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for the first four runoff seasons after the fire, from 2000 through 2003. Spatial and temporal trends in radiological and chemical constituents that were identified as being associated with the Cerro Grande fire and those that were identified as being associated with historic LANL discharges are evaluated with regard to impacts to the Rio Grande and area reservoirs downstream of LANL. The results of environmental sampling performed by LANL, the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED), and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) after the Cerro Grande fire are included in the evaluation. Effects are described for storm runoff, baseflow, stream sediments, and area regional reservoir sediment.« less