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Title: Reproducible, Component-based Modeling with TopoFlow, A Spatial Hydrologic Modeling Toolkit

Abstract

Modern geoscientists have online access to an abundance of different data sets and models, but these resources differ from each other in myriad ways and this heterogeneity works against interoperability as well as reproducibility. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the main issues and some best practices for addressing the challenge of reproducible science in the context of a relatively simple hydrologic modeling study for a small Arctic watershed near Fairbanks, Alaska. This study requires several different types of input data in addition to several, coupled model components. All data sets, model components and processing scripts (e.g. for preparation of data and figures, and for analysis of model output) are fully documented and made available online at persistent URLs. Similarly, all source code for the models and scripts is open-source, version controlled and made available online via GitHub. Each model component has a Basic Model Interface (BMI) to simplify coupling and its own HTML help page that includes a list of all equations and variables used. The set of all model components (TopoFlow) has also been made available as a Python package for easy installation. Three different graphical user interfaces for setting up TopoFlow runs are described, includingmore » one that allows model components to run and be coupled as web services.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [3]
  1. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Inst. of Arctic and Alpine Research
  2. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  3. Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). International Arctic Research Center
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; National Science Foundation (NSF)
Contributing Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
1356158
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-23050
Journal ID: ISSN 2333-5084
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396; ICER 1440332; 1440333; PLR 1503559
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Earth and Space Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 2333-5084
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union (AGU)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; reproducibility; component-based modeling; hydrologic model; TopoFlow; open-source; Python

Citation Formats

Peckham, Scott D., Stoica, Maria, Jafarov, Elchin, Endalamaw, Abraham, and Bolton, William R.. Reproducible, Component-based Modeling with TopoFlow, A Spatial Hydrologic Modeling Toolkit. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/2016EA000237.
Peckham, Scott D., Stoica, Maria, Jafarov, Elchin, Endalamaw, Abraham, & Bolton, William R.. Reproducible, Component-based Modeling with TopoFlow, A Spatial Hydrologic Modeling Toolkit. United States. doi:10.1002/2016EA000237.
Peckham, Scott D., Stoica, Maria, Jafarov, Elchin, Endalamaw, Abraham, and Bolton, William R.. Wed . "Reproducible, Component-based Modeling with TopoFlow, A Spatial Hydrologic Modeling Toolkit". United States. doi:10.1002/2016EA000237. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1356158.
@article{osti_1356158,
title = {Reproducible, Component-based Modeling with TopoFlow, A Spatial Hydrologic Modeling Toolkit},
author = {Peckham, Scott D. and Stoica, Maria and Jafarov, Elchin and Endalamaw, Abraham and Bolton, William R.},
abstractNote = {Modern geoscientists have online access to an abundance of different data sets and models, but these resources differ from each other in myriad ways and this heterogeneity works against interoperability as well as reproducibility. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the main issues and some best practices for addressing the challenge of reproducible science in the context of a relatively simple hydrologic modeling study for a small Arctic watershed near Fairbanks, Alaska. This study requires several different types of input data in addition to several, coupled model components. All data sets, model components and processing scripts (e.g. for preparation of data and figures, and for analysis of model output) are fully documented and made available online at persistent URLs. Similarly, all source code for the models and scripts is open-source, version controlled and made available online via GitHub. Each model component has a Basic Model Interface (BMI) to simplify coupling and its own HTML help page that includes a list of all equations and variables used. The set of all model components (TopoFlow) has also been made available as a Python package for easy installation. Three different graphical user interfaces for setting up TopoFlow runs are described, including one that allows model components to run and be coupled as web services.},
doi = {10.1002/2016EA000237},
journal = {Earth and Space Science},
number = 6,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 26 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Apr 26 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
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