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Title: Two-Stage Fracturing Wastewater Management in Shale Gas Development

Abstract

Here, management of shale gas wastewater treatment, disposal, and reuse has become a significant environmental challenge, driven by an ongoing boom in development of U.S. shale gas reservoirs. Systems-analysis based decision support is helpful for effective management of wastewater, and provision of cost-effective decision alternatives from a whole-system perspective. Uncertainties are inherent in many modeling parameters, affecting the generated decisions. In order to effectively deal with the recourse issue in decision making, in this work a two-stage stochastic fracturing wastewater management model, named TSWM, is developed to provide decision support for wastewater management planning in shale plays. Using the TSWM model, probabilistic and nonprobabilistic uncertainties are effectively handled. The TSWM model provides flexibility in generating shale gas wastewater management strategies, in which the first-stage decision predefined by decision makers before uncertainties are unfolded is corrected in the second stage to achieve the whole-system’s optimality. Application of the TSWM model to a comprehensive synthetic example demonstrates its practical applicability and feasibility. Optimal results are generated for allowable wastewater quantities, excess wastewater, and capacity expansions of hazardous wastewater treatment plants to achieve the minimized total system cost. The obtained interval solutions encompass both optimistic and conservative decisions. Trade-offs between economic and environmentalmore » objectives are made depending on decision makers’ knowledge and judgment, as well as site-specific information. In conclusion, the proposed model is helpful in forming informed decisions for wastewater management associated with shale gas development.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1356138
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-27947
Journal ID: ISSN 0888-5885
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 56; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 0888-5885
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; Environmental Protection; Mathematics; Shale gas, hydraulic fracturing, flowback and produced water, two-stage, stochastic

Citation Formats

Zhang, Xiaodong, Sun, Alexander Y., Duncan, Ian J., and Vesselinov, Velimir V. Two-Stage Fracturing Wastewater Management in Shale Gas Development. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.iecr.6b03971.
Zhang, Xiaodong, Sun, Alexander Y., Duncan, Ian J., & Vesselinov, Velimir V. Two-Stage Fracturing Wastewater Management in Shale Gas Development. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.iecr.6b03971.
Zhang, Xiaodong, Sun, Alexander Y., Duncan, Ian J., and Vesselinov, Velimir V. Thu . "Two-Stage Fracturing Wastewater Management in Shale Gas Development". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.iecr.6b03971. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1356138.
@article{osti_1356138,
title = {Two-Stage Fracturing Wastewater Management in Shale Gas Development},
author = {Zhang, Xiaodong and Sun, Alexander Y. and Duncan, Ian J. and Vesselinov, Velimir V.},
abstractNote = {Here, management of shale gas wastewater treatment, disposal, and reuse has become a significant environmental challenge, driven by an ongoing boom in development of U.S. shale gas reservoirs. Systems-analysis based decision support is helpful for effective management of wastewater, and provision of cost-effective decision alternatives from a whole-system perspective. Uncertainties are inherent in many modeling parameters, affecting the generated decisions. In order to effectively deal with the recourse issue in decision making, in this work a two-stage stochastic fracturing wastewater management model, named TSWM, is developed to provide decision support for wastewater management planning in shale plays. Using the TSWM model, probabilistic and nonprobabilistic uncertainties are effectively handled. The TSWM model provides flexibility in generating shale gas wastewater management strategies, in which the first-stage decision predefined by decision makers before uncertainties are unfolded is corrected in the second stage to achieve the whole-system’s optimality. Application of the TSWM model to a comprehensive synthetic example demonstrates its practical applicability and feasibility. Optimal results are generated for allowable wastewater quantities, excess wastewater, and capacity expansions of hazardous wastewater treatment plants to achieve the minimized total system cost. The obtained interval solutions encompass both optimistic and conservative decisions. Trade-offs between economic and environmental objectives are made depending on decision makers’ knowledge and judgment, as well as site-specific information. In conclusion, the proposed model is helpful in forming informed decisions for wastewater management associated with shale gas development.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.iecr.6b03971},
journal = {Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research},
number = 6,
volume = 56,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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