skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Data set for Journal article "The shale gas revolution: barriers, sustainability, and emerging opportunities"

Abstract

Shale gas and hydraulic refracturing has revolutionized the US energy sector in terms of prices, consumption, and CO 2 emissions. However, key questions remain including environmental concerns and extraction efficiencies that are leveling off. For the first time, we identify key discoveries, lessons learned, and recommendations from this shale gas revolution through extensive data mining and analysis of 23 years of production from 20,000 wells. Discoveries include identification of a learning-bydoing process where disruptive technology innovation led to a doubling in shale gas extraction, how refracturing with emerging technologies can transform existing wells, and how overall shale gas production is actually dominated by long-term tail production rather than the high-profile initial exponentially-declining production in the first 12 months. We hypothesize that tail production can be manipulated, through better fracturing techniques and alternative working fluids such as CO 2, to increase shale gas recovery and minimize environmental impacts such as through carbon sequestration.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1356118
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-23646
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; Earth Sciences; Shale gas production data

Citation Formats

Middleton, Richard Stephen. Data set for Journal article "The shale gas revolution: barriers, sustainability, and emerging opportunities". United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1356118.
Middleton, Richard Stephen. Data set for Journal article "The shale gas revolution: barriers, sustainability, and emerging opportunities". United States. doi:10.2172/1356118.
Middleton, Richard Stephen. Thu . "Data set for Journal article "The shale gas revolution: barriers, sustainability, and emerging opportunities"". United States. doi:10.2172/1356118. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1356118.
@article{osti_1356118,
title = {Data set for Journal article "The shale gas revolution: barriers, sustainability, and emerging opportunities"},
author = {Middleton, Richard Stephen},
abstractNote = {Shale gas and hydraulic refracturing has revolutionized the US energy sector in terms of prices, consumption, and CO2 emissions. However, key questions remain including environmental concerns and extraction efficiencies that are leveling off. For the first time, we identify key discoveries, lessons learned, and recommendations from this shale gas revolution through extensive data mining and analysis of 23 years of production from 20,000 wells. Discoveries include identification of a learning-bydoing process where disruptive technology innovation led to a doubling in shale gas extraction, how refracturing with emerging technologies can transform existing wells, and how overall shale gas production is actually dominated by long-term tail production rather than the high-profile initial exponentially-declining production in the first 12 months. We hypothesize that tail production can be manipulated, through better fracturing techniques and alternative working fluids such as CO2, to increase shale gas recovery and minimize environmental impacts such as through carbon sequestration.},
doi = {10.2172/1356118},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu May 04 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu May 04 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • Shale gas and hydraulic refracturing has revolutionized the US energy sector in terms of prices, consumption, and CO 2 emissions. However, key questions remain including environmental concerns and extraction efficiencies that are leveling off. For the first time, we identify key discoveries, lessons learned, and recommendations from this shale gas revolution through extensive data mining and analysis of 23 years of production from 20,000 wells. Discoveries include identification of a learning-by-doing process where disruptive technology innovation led to a doubling in shale gas extraction, how refracturing with emerging technologies can transform existing wells, and how overall shale gas production ismore » actually dominated by long-term tail production rather than the high-profile initial exponentially-declining production in the first 12 months. We hypothesize that tail production can be manipulated, through better fracturing techniques and alternative working fluids such as CO 2, to increase shale gas recovery and minimize environmental impacts such as through carbon sequestration.« less
  • Shale gas and hydraulic refracturing has revolutionized the US energy sector in terms of prices, consumption, and CO 2 emissions. However, key questions remain including environmental concerns and extraction efficiencies that are leveling off. For the first time, we identify key discoveries, lessons learned, and recommendations from this shale gas revolution through extensive data mining and analysis of 23 years of production from 20,000 wells. Discoveries include identification of a learning-by-doing process where disruptive technology innovation led to a doubling in shale gas extraction, how refracturing with emerging technologies can transform existing wells, and how overall shale gas production ismore » actually dominated by long-term tail production rather than the high-profile initial exponentially-declining production in the first 12 months. We hypothesize that tail production can be manipulated, through better fracturing techniques and alternative working fluids such as CO 2, to increase shale gas recovery and minimize environmental impacts such as through carbon sequestration.« less
  • The study was undertaken to identify opportunities for the use of gas fueled cogeneration equipment in emerging industrial processes and to understand technical, economic, and institutional barriers to their use. A process owner has several design alternatives to cogeneration such as process heat recovery, modification of process equipment, and the use of heat pumps that can impact and serve as alternatives to cogeneration systems. To understand these alternatives, a new design method called Pinch Technology was used in this investigation. Over 30 emerging processes were surveyed from the paper and pulp, food, chemical, oil and gas, and waste-to-fuel industries. Themore » study identified potential for the use of gas turbines in two new pulping processes and for the use of gas engines in food processing applications such as soybean oil plants.« less
  • In the United States, recent shale gas discoveries have generated renewed interest in using natural gas as a vehicular fuel, primarily in fleet applications, while outside the United States, natural gas vehicle use has expanded significantly in the past decade. In this report for the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities Program - a public-private partnership that advances the energy, economic, and environmental security of the U.S. by supporting local decisions that reduce petroleum use in the transportation sector - we have examined the state of natural gas vehicle technology, current market status, energy and environmental benefits, implications regarding advancementsmore » in European natural gas vehicle technologies, research and development efforts, and current market barriers and opportunities for greater market penetration. The authors contend that commercial intracity trucks are a prime area for advancement of this fuel. Therefore, we examined an aggressive future market penetration of natural gas heavy-duty vehicles that could be seen as a long-term goal. Under this scenario using Energy Information Administration projections and GREET life-cycle modeling of U.S. on-road heavy-duty use, natural gas vehicles would reduce petroleum consumption by approximately 1.2 million barrels of oil per day, while another 400,000 barrels of oil per day reduction could be achieved with significant use of natural gas off-road vehicles. This scenario would reduce daily oil consumption in the United States by about 8%.« less
  • This study examines the special developmental opportunities for local, state, regional, and federal programs relating to Devonian Shale, coal seams, and other difficult natural gas sources for maintaining and increasing employment in the Appalachian Region. Governmental and private sector activities are discussed, both encouraging and constraining, along with recommendations and potentials for development. The work researches the technical, economic, and institutional issues and case histories for gas from Devonian Shale, coal seams, and other difficult sources such as gas from deep drilling, Lake Erie potential, and other low permeable sources. Market characteristics and opportunities are examined for utilities, large andmore » small independent producers, and producer-consumers. A special legal study of methane gas ownership in coalbeds is included.« less