skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Data set for Journal article "The shale gas revolution: barriers, sustainability, and emerging opportunities"

Abstract

Shale gas and hydraulic refracturing has revolutionized the US energy sector in terms of prices, consumption, and CO 2 emissions. However, key questions remain including environmental concerns and extraction efficiencies that are leveling off. For the first time, we identify key discoveries, lessons learned, and recommendations from this shale gas revolution through extensive data mining and analysis of 23 years of production from 20,000 wells. Discoveries include identification of a learning-bydoing process where disruptive technology innovation led to a doubling in shale gas extraction, how refracturing with emerging technologies can transform existing wells, and how overall shale gas production is actually dominated by long-term tail production rather than the high-profile initial exponentially-declining production in the first 12 months. We hypothesize that tail production can be manipulated, through better fracturing techniques and alternative working fluids such as CO 2, to increase shale gas recovery and minimize environmental impacts such as through carbon sequestration.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1356118
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-23646
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; Earth Sciences; Shale gas production data

Citation Formats

Middleton, Richard Stephen. Data set for Journal article "The shale gas revolution: barriers, sustainability, and emerging opportunities". United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1356118.
Middleton, Richard Stephen. Data set for Journal article "The shale gas revolution: barriers, sustainability, and emerging opportunities". United States. doi:10.2172/1356118.
Middleton, Richard Stephen. 2017. "Data set for Journal article "The shale gas revolution: barriers, sustainability, and emerging opportunities"". United States. doi:10.2172/1356118. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1356118.
@article{osti_1356118,
title = {Data set for Journal article "The shale gas revolution: barriers, sustainability, and emerging opportunities"},
author = {Middleton, Richard Stephen},
abstractNote = {Shale gas and hydraulic refracturing has revolutionized the US energy sector in terms of prices, consumption, and CO2 emissions. However, key questions remain including environmental concerns and extraction efficiencies that are leveling off. For the first time, we identify key discoveries, lessons learned, and recommendations from this shale gas revolution through extensive data mining and analysis of 23 years of production from 20,000 wells. Discoveries include identification of a learning-bydoing process where disruptive technology innovation led to a doubling in shale gas extraction, how refracturing with emerging technologies can transform existing wells, and how overall shale gas production is actually dominated by long-term tail production rather than the high-profile initial exponentially-declining production in the first 12 months. We hypothesize that tail production can be manipulated, through better fracturing techniques and alternative working fluids such as CO2, to increase shale gas recovery and minimize environmental impacts such as through carbon sequestration.},
doi = {10.2172/1356118},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • Shale gas and hydraulic refracturing has revolutionized the US energy sector in terms of prices, consumption, and CO 2 emissions. However, key questions remain including environmental concerns and extraction efficiencies that are leveling off. For the first time, we identify key discoveries, lessons learned, and recommendations from this shale gas revolution through extensive data mining and analysis of 23 years of production from 20,000 wells. Discoveries include identification of a learning-by-doing process where disruptive technology innovation led to a doubling in shale gas extraction, how refracturing with emerging technologies can transform existing wells, and how overall shale gas production ismore » actually dominated by long-term tail production rather than the high-profile initial exponentially-declining production in the first 12 months. We hypothesize that tail production can be manipulated, through better fracturing techniques and alternative working fluids such as CO 2, to increase shale gas recovery and minimize environmental impacts such as through carbon sequestration.« less
  • Shale gas and hydraulic refracturing has revolutionized the US energy sector in terms of prices, consumption, and CO 2 emissions. However, key questions remain including environmental concerns and extraction efficiencies that are leveling off. For the first time, we identify key discoveries, lessons learned, and recommendations from this shale gas revolution through extensive data mining and analysis of 23 years of production from 20,000 wells. Discoveries include identification of a learning-by-doing process where disruptive technology innovation led to a doubling in shale gas extraction, how refracturing with emerging technologies can transform existing wells, and how overall shale gas production ismore » actually dominated by long-term tail production rather than the high-profile initial exponentially-declining production in the first 12 months. We hypothesize that tail production can be manipulated, through better fracturing techniques and alternative working fluids such as CO 2, to increase shale gas recovery and minimize environmental impacts such as through carbon sequestration.« less
  • Discussion is presented under the following headings: characteristics of methanol; current and potential chemical uses of methanol; current and potential uses of methanol in spark-ignition engines; other potential fuel uses of methanol; methanol technology, raw materials, and production costs; supply, demand, and price prospects for methanol; Opportunities for developing countries; and Policy issues and world bank role.
  • The study was undertaken to identify opportunities for the use of gas fueled cogeneration equipment in emerging industrial processes and to understand technical, economic, and institutional barriers to their use. A process owner has several design alternatives to cogeneration such as process heat recovery, modification of process equipment, and the use of heat pumps that can impact and serve as alternatives to cogeneration systems. To understand these alternatives, a new design method called Pinch Technology was used in this investigation. Over 30 emerging processes were surveyed from the paper and pulp, food, chemical, oil and gas, and waste-to-fuel industries. Themore » study identified potential for the use of gas turbines in two new pulping processes and for the use of gas engines in food processing applications such as soybean oil plants.« less
  • This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. DOE Roundtable and Workshop on Advanced Steel Technologies Workshop hosted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE s) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) on held on June 23, 2015. Representatives from industry, government, and academia met at the offices of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Washington, DC, to share information on emerging steel technologies, issues impacting technology investment and deployment, gaps in research and development (R&D), and opportunities for greater energy efficiency. The results of the workshop are summarized in thismore » report. They reflect a snapshot of the perspectives and ideas generated by the individuals who attended and not all-inclusive of the steel industry and stakeholder community.« less