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Title: Community Earth System Model (CESM) Tutorial 2016 Final Report

Abstract

For the 2016 tutorial, NCAR/CGD requested a total budget of $70,000 split equally between DOE and NSF. The funds were used to support student participation (travel, lodging, per diem, etc.). Lectures and practical session support was primarily provided by local participants at no additional cost (see list below). The seventh annual Community Earth System Model (CESM) tutorial (2016) for students and early career scientists was held 8 – 12 August 2016. As has been the case over the last few years, this event was extremely successful and there was greater demand than could be met. There was continued interest in support of the NSF’s EaSM Infrastructure awards, to train these awardees in the application of the CESM. Based on suggestions from previous tutorial participants, the 2016 tutorial experience again provided direct connection to Yellowstone for each individual participant (rather than pairs), and used the NCAR Mesa Library. The 2016 tutorial included lectures on simulating the climate system and practical sessions on running CESM, modifying components, and analyzing data. These were targeted to the graduate student level. In addition, specific talks (“Application” talks) were introduced this year to provide participants with some in-depth knowledge of some specific aspects of CESM.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) and National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and Climate and Global Dynamics Laboratory (CGD), Boulder, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1355933
Report Number(s):
DOE-NCAR-15647
DOE Contract Number:
SC0015647
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Related Information: http://www.cesm.ucar.edu/events/tutorials/2016/
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; Community Earth System Model

Citation Formats

Lamarque, Jean-Francois. Community Earth System Model (CESM) Tutorial 2016 Final Report. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1355933.
Lamarque, Jean-Francois. Community Earth System Model (CESM) Tutorial 2016 Final Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1355933.
Lamarque, Jean-Francois. Tue . "Community Earth System Model (CESM) Tutorial 2016 Final Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1355933. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1355933.
@article{osti_1355933,
title = {Community Earth System Model (CESM) Tutorial 2016 Final Report},
author = {Lamarque, Jean-Francois},
abstractNote = {For the 2016 tutorial, NCAR/CGD requested a total budget of $70,000 split equally between DOE and NSF. The funds were used to support student participation (travel, lodging, per diem, etc.). Lectures and practical session support was primarily provided by local participants at no additional cost (see list below). The seventh annual Community Earth System Model (CESM) tutorial (2016) for students and early career scientists was held 8 – 12 August 2016. As has been the case over the last few years, this event was extremely successful and there was greater demand than could be met. There was continued interest in support of the NSF’s EaSM Infrastructure awards, to train these awardees in the application of the CESM. Based on suggestions from previous tutorial participants, the 2016 tutorial experience again provided direct connection to Yellowstone for each individual participant (rather than pairs), and used the NCAR Mesa Library. The 2016 tutorial included lectures on simulating the climate system and practical sessions on running CESM, modifying components, and analyzing data. These were targeted to the graduate student level. In addition, specific talks (“Application” talks) were introduced this year to provide participants with some in-depth knowledge of some specific aspects of CESM.},
doi = {10.2172/1355933},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 09 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue May 09 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • In this project we have been upgrading the Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF) in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), also known as Super-Parameterized CAM (SP-CAM). This has included a major effort to update the coding standards and interface with CAM so that it can be placed on the main development trunk. It has also included development of a new software structure for CAM to be able to handle sub-grid column information. These efforts have formed the major thrust of the work.
  • This is the Final Report of our four-year (3-year plus one-year no cost extension) collaborative project between the University of Arizona (UA) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The overall objective of our project is to develop and evaluate the first hybrid 3-D hydrological model with a horizontal grid spacing of 1 km for the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM).
  • This is the Final Report of our four-year (3-year plus one-year no cost extension) collaborative project between the University of Arizona (UA) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The overall objective of our project is to develop and evaluate the first hybrid 3-D hydrological model with a horizontal grid spacing of 1 km for the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM). We have made substantial progress in model development and evaluation, computational efficiencies and software engineering, and data development and evaluation, as discussed in Sections 2-4. Section 5 presents our success in data dissemination, while Section 6 discussesmore » the scientific impacts of our work. Section 7 discusses education and mentoring success of our project, while Section 8 lists our relevant DOE services. All peer-reviewed papers that acknowledged this project are listed in Section 9. Highlights of our achievements include: • We have finished 20 papers (most published already) on model development and evaluation, computational efficiencies and software engineering, and data development and evaluation • The global datasets developed under this project have been permanently archived and publicly available • Some of our research results have already been implemented in WRF and CLM • Patrick Broxton and Michael Brunke have received their Ph.D. • PI Zeng has served on DOE proposal review panels and DOE lab scientific focus area (SFA) review panels« less
  • The Community Earth System Model (CESM) is a fully-coupled, global climate model that provides state-of-the-art computer simulations of the Earth's past, present, and future climate states. This document provides the agenda and list of participants for the conference. Web materials for all lectures and practical sessions available from: http://www.cesm.ucar.edu/events/tutorials/073012/ .
  • In fiscal year 2011, the Community Earth System Model (CESM) tutorial was taught at NCAR from 1-5 August 2011. This project hosted 79 full participants (1 accepted participant from China couldn't get a visa) selected from 180 applications. The tutorial was advertised through emails to CESM mailing lists. NCAR staff and long-term visitors (who were not eligible to attend) were also invited to 'audit' the climate and practical lectures and to work on the practical sessions on their own. 15 NCAR staff and long-term visitors took advantage of this opportunity. The majority of the students were graduate students, but severalmore » post-docs, faculty, and other research scientists also attended. Additionally, many people are using the on-line lessons and practical sessions. As of August 18, 2011, 407 people had registered to access and use the tutorial from 33 countries all over the world, but a majority from US universities. In fiscal year 2011, the Climate and Global Dynamics Division Information Systems Group (CGD/ISG) built and operated a temporary computer laboratory in a meeting room. This project was made possible through funding from the National Science Foundation Directorate of Geosciences, and the Department of Energy Office of Science.« less