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Title: A Successful Small Wind Future: There Is Great Potential

Abstract

Suzanne Tegen made this presentation at the 2017 Small Wind Conference in Bloomington, Minnesota. It provides an overview of DOE-sponsored small wind products, testing, and support; an example of a Regional Resource Center defending distributed wind; the recently published Distributed Wind Taxonomy; the dWind model and recent results; and other recent DOE and NREL publications related to small and distributed wind.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1355868
Report Number(s):
NREL/PR-5000-68350
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the 13th Annual Small Wind Conference, 10-11 April 2017, Bloomington, Minnesota
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; small wind; small wind research; distributed wind; distributed wind taxonomy; distributed wind model; dWind

Citation Formats

Tegen, Suzanne. A Successful Small Wind Future: There Is Great Potential. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Tegen, Suzanne. A Successful Small Wind Future: There Is Great Potential. United States.
Tegen, Suzanne. Tue . "A Successful Small Wind Future: There Is Great Potential". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1355868.
@article{osti_1355868,
title = {A Successful Small Wind Future: There Is Great Potential},
author = {Tegen, Suzanne},
abstractNote = {Suzanne Tegen made this presentation at the 2017 Small Wind Conference in Bloomington, Minnesota. It provides an overview of DOE-sponsored small wind products, testing, and support; an example of a Regional Resource Center defending distributed wind; the recently published Distributed Wind Taxonomy; the dWind model and recent results; and other recent DOE and NREL publications related to small and distributed wind.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 02 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue May 02 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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