skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Trends in Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research & Development - A Physics Perspective

Abstract

This document entitled “Trends in Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Development – A Physics Perspective” reviews the accessible literature, as it relates to nuclear explosion monitoring and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT, 1996), for four research areas: source physics (understanding signal generation), signal propagation (accounting for changes through physical media), sensors (recording the signals), and signal analysis (processing the signal). Over 40 trends are addressed, such as moving from 1D to 3D earth models, from pick-based seismic event processing to full waveform processing, and from separate treatment of mechanical waves in different media to combined analyses. Highlighted in the document for each trend are the value and benefit to the monitoring mission, key papers that advanced the science, and promising research and development for the future.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [5];  [5]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  3. Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Washington, DC (United States)
  4. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  5. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1355758
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-21274
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Maceira, Monica, Blom, Philip Stephen, MacCarthy, Jonathan K., Marcillo, Omar Eduardo, Euler, Garrett Gene, Begnaud, Michael Lee, Ford, Sean R., Pasyanos, Michael E., Orris, Gregory J., Foxe, Michael P., Arrowsmith, Stephen J., Merchant, B. John, and Slinkard, Megan E.. Trends in Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research & Development - A Physics Perspective. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1355758.
Maceira, Monica, Blom, Philip Stephen, MacCarthy, Jonathan K., Marcillo, Omar Eduardo, Euler, Garrett Gene, Begnaud, Michael Lee, Ford, Sean R., Pasyanos, Michael E., Orris, Gregory J., Foxe, Michael P., Arrowsmith, Stephen J., Merchant, B. John, & Slinkard, Megan E.. Trends in Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research & Development - A Physics Perspective. United States. doi:10.2172/1355758.
Maceira, Monica, Blom, Philip Stephen, MacCarthy, Jonathan K., Marcillo, Omar Eduardo, Euler, Garrett Gene, Begnaud, Michael Lee, Ford, Sean R., Pasyanos, Michael E., Orris, Gregory J., Foxe, Michael P., Arrowsmith, Stephen J., Merchant, B. John, and Slinkard, Megan E.. Thu . "Trends in Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research & Development - A Physics Perspective". United States. doi:10.2172/1355758. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1355758.
@article{osti_1355758,
title = {Trends in Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research & Development - A Physics Perspective},
author = {Maceira, Monica and Blom, Philip Stephen and MacCarthy, Jonathan K. and Marcillo, Omar Eduardo and Euler, Garrett Gene and Begnaud, Michael Lee and Ford, Sean R. and Pasyanos, Michael E. and Orris, Gregory J. and Foxe, Michael P. and Arrowsmith, Stephen J. and Merchant, B. John and Slinkard, Megan E.},
abstractNote = {This document entitled “Trends in Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Development – A Physics Perspective” reviews the accessible literature, as it relates to nuclear explosion monitoring and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT, 1996), for four research areas: source physics (understanding signal generation), signal propagation (accounting for changes through physical media), sensors (recording the signals), and signal analysis (processing the signal). Over 40 trends are addressed, such as moving from 1D to 3D earth models, from pick-based seismic event processing to full waveform processing, and from separate treatment of mechanical waves in different media to combined analyses. Highlighted in the document for each trend are the value and benefit to the monitoring mission, key papers that advanced the science, and promising research and development for the future.},
doi = {10.2172/1355758},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • The process of developing the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Knowledge Base (KB) must result in high-quality Information Products in order to support activities for monitoring nuclear explosions consistent with United States treaty and testing moratoria monitoring missions. The validation, verification, and management of the Information Products is critical to successful scientific integration, and hence, will enable high-quality deliveries to be made to the United States National Data Center (USNDC) at the Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC). As an Information Product passes through the steps necessary to become part of a delivery to AFTAC, domain experts (including technical KBmore » Working Groups that comprise NNSA and DOE laboratory staff and the customer) will provide coordination and validation, where validation is the determination of relevance and scientific quality. Verification is the check for completeness and correctness, and will be performed by both the Knowledge Base Integrator and the Scientific Integrator with support from the Contributor providing two levels of testing to assure content integrity and performance. The Information Products and their contained data sets will be systematically tracked through the integration portion of their life cycle. The integration process, based on lessons learned during its initial implementations, is presented in this report.« less
  • Work in nuclear safety is discussed. Site selections for nuclear power plants including studies of reactor accidents are described. Plans for laboratory-scale investigations and mockup and full-scale reactor experiments for the study of accident phenomena are outlined. Studies of fission-product-release behavior are also described. (M.C.G.)
  • The partial contents are: Add Stations to the IMS System; Extend and Improve Event Identification Capabilities; Extend the Knowledge Acquisition Subsystem and Add New Knowledge; Enhance the Productivity of Independent R and D with NMRD Software and Data.
  • The general goal of this work has been to apply and develop theoretical models for the low energy structure of atomic nuclei. A major focus in recent years has been the theoretical description of proton emission from spherical and near-spherical nuclei. Another broad area involves phenomenological particle-core coupling, in which one or a few particles are explicitly coupled to a collective core. Level energies, spins, parities, and electromagnetic matrix elements (both static moments and transition rates) can be calculated and compared with experimental data, for both low-spin and high-spin states. Such calculations can be used to probe the collective coremore » (e.g., ''the nuclear shape''), identify and characterize particular deformed single-particle orbitals (Nilsson states) and investigate residual interactions between unpaired nucleons (e.g., proton-neutron interactions in odd-odd nuclei). A complete list of collaborators is given.« less
  • These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 26th Seismic Research Review: Trends in Nuclear Explosion Monitoring, held 21-23 September, 2004 in Orlando, Florida. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users,more » an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.« less