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Title: Combustion energy frontier research center (CEFRC) final report (August 1, 2009 – July 31, 2016)

Abstract

The Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center (CEFRC) was established to tackle the single overarching grand challenge of energy sustainability, energy security and global warming: to develop a “validated, predictive, multi-scale, combustion modeling capability to optimize the design and operation of evolving fuels in advanced engines for transportation applications,” as identified in the DOE report on “Basic Energy Needs for Clean and Efficient Combustion of 21st Century Transportation Fuels”. The challenge is particularly daunting since energy conversion efficiencies and exhaust emissions are governed by coupled chemical and transport processes at multiple length scales ranging from electron excitation to molecular rearrangements to nanoscale particulate formation to turbulent fuel/air mixing. To tackle this challenge, the CEFRC assembled a world-class team of 15 principal investigators, with the objectives to: 1) develop and test theoretical models to predict elementary reaction rates, molecule thermalization rates, chemical bond dissociation energies, and nonequilibrium transport properties using quantum chemistry calculations that account for strong electron correlation and multiple electronic potential energy surfaces; 2) develop automated kinetic mechanism generation, reduction, and error control methods for predicting alternative fuel including biofuel oxidation, fuel droplet decomposition, and NOx and particulate formation; 3) validate and improve the predictions of these models by measuringmore » ignition delay times, species profiles, flame structures, burning limits, turbulence-kinetic coupling, and NOx and soot emissions at high-pressures and near-limit conditions, by using advanced experimental diagnostic techniques including multiple laser techniques, molecular beam sampling and synchrotron photoionization, and by conducting the measurements in high-pressure shock tubes, jet-stirred and flow reactors, flame bombs, counterflow flames, and advanced-design rapid compression ignition instruments; and 4) develop a suite of validated petascale high-fidelity simulation and modeling capabilities to understand and predict chemistry-turbulence-radiation coupling for new fuels in new regimes, including the high pressure, low-temperature combustion in advanced engine and turbine designs, and 5) establish a knowledge highway between researchers and engineers in academia, national laboratories, and industry to facilitate the dissemination and exchange of knowledge on national and international levels, and enrich the talent pool and capabilities of the next generation of combustion scientists and engineers. The technical activities of the CEFRC were conducted through three Disciplinary Working Groups – Chemistry Theory, Experiment and Mechanism, and Reacting Flows, which coordinated the Center’s research on the development of combustion chemistry of Foundation Fuels (C0–C4 hydrocarbons), Alcohols, and Biodiesel through three corresponding Mechanism Thrust Groups. Such a two-dimensional coordinated and tightly interwoven research structure has been proven to be highly effective in assuring the interplay between the developments of the fundamentals of combustion science and the utilization of the various categories of fuels. The Center has accomplished the above goals over the five year period (August 1, 2009 – July 31, 2014) with appropriated funding, followed by two additional no-cost-extension (NCE) years. The research results are documented in 230 journal publications, with six legacy review papers on the study of combustion chemistry using shock tubes, flow reactors, rapid compression machines, and flames, on uncertainty quantification, and on theoretical reaction dynamics and chemical modeling of combustion. A robust outreach program complemented these PI-led research activities, consisting of: 1) a roving post-doc program comprised of a corps of Center-appointed, co- or multi-sponsored post-doctoral fellows with rotating assignments to conduct seed projects initiated by at least two PIs, in residence with these sponsoring PIs, to rapidly pursue new and high-risk, high-payoff interdisciplinary ideas; 2) an annual summer school on combustion heavily attended (~200) by senior graduate students and practicing researchers covering advanced topics on chemical kinetics, fluid mechanics, turbulent combustion, engine combustion, new technologies, etc.; 3) a robust open web-site providing Center and community information as well as the lecture videos and notes of the summer school; and 4) widely distributed biannual newsletters.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1355751
Report Number(s):
Final: DOE-Princeton-01198-1
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0001198
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION

Citation Formats

Law, Chung. Combustion energy frontier research center (CEFRC) final report (August 1, 2009 – July 31, 2016). United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1355751.
Law, Chung. Combustion energy frontier research center (CEFRC) final report (August 1, 2009 – July 31, 2016). United States. doi:10.2172/1355751.
Law, Chung. Fri . "Combustion energy frontier research center (CEFRC) final report (August 1, 2009 – July 31, 2016)". United States. doi:10.2172/1355751. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1355751.
@article{osti_1355751,
title = {Combustion energy frontier research center (CEFRC) final report (August 1, 2009 – July 31, 2016)},
author = {Law, Chung},
abstractNote = {The Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center (CEFRC) was established to tackle the single overarching grand challenge of energy sustainability, energy security and global warming: to develop a “validated, predictive, multi-scale, combustion modeling capability to optimize the design and operation of evolving fuels in advanced engines for transportation applications,” as identified in the DOE report on “Basic Energy Needs for Clean and Efficient Combustion of 21st Century Transportation Fuels”. The challenge is particularly daunting since energy conversion efficiencies and exhaust emissions are governed by coupled chemical and transport processes at multiple length scales ranging from electron excitation to molecular rearrangements to nanoscale particulate formation to turbulent fuel/air mixing. To tackle this challenge, the CEFRC assembled a world-class team of 15 principal investigators, with the objectives to: 1) develop and test theoretical models to predict elementary reaction rates, molecule thermalization rates, chemical bond dissociation energies, and nonequilibrium transport properties using quantum chemistry calculations that account for strong electron correlation and multiple electronic potential energy surfaces; 2) develop automated kinetic mechanism generation, reduction, and error control methods for predicting alternative fuel including biofuel oxidation, fuel droplet decomposition, and NOx and particulate formation; 3) validate and improve the predictions of these models by measuring ignition delay times, species profiles, flame structures, burning limits, turbulence-kinetic coupling, and NOx and soot emissions at high-pressures and near-limit conditions, by using advanced experimental diagnostic techniques including multiple laser techniques, molecular beam sampling and synchrotron photoionization, and by conducting the measurements in high-pressure shock tubes, jet-stirred and flow reactors, flame bombs, counterflow flames, and advanced-design rapid compression ignition instruments; and 4) develop a suite of validated petascale high-fidelity simulation and modeling capabilities to understand and predict chemistry-turbulence-radiation coupling for new fuels in new regimes, including the high pressure, low-temperature combustion in advanced engine and turbine designs, and 5) establish a knowledge highway between researchers and engineers in academia, national laboratories, and industry to facilitate the dissemination and exchange of knowledge on national and international levels, and enrich the talent pool and capabilities of the next generation of combustion scientists and engineers. The technical activities of the CEFRC were conducted through three Disciplinary Working Groups – Chemistry Theory, Experiment and Mechanism, and Reacting Flows, which coordinated the Center’s research on the development of combustion chemistry of Foundation Fuels (C0–C4 hydrocarbons), Alcohols, and Biodiesel through three corresponding Mechanism Thrust Groups. Such a two-dimensional coordinated and tightly interwoven research structure has been proven to be highly effective in assuring the interplay between the developments of the fundamentals of combustion science and the utilization of the various categories of fuels. The Center has accomplished the above goals over the five year period (August 1, 2009 – July 31, 2014) with appropriated funding, followed by two additional no-cost-extension (NCE) years. The research results are documented in 230 journal publications, with six legacy review papers on the study of combustion chemistry using shock tubes, flow reactors, rapid compression machines, and flames, on uncertainty quantification, and on theoretical reaction dynamics and chemical modeling of combustion. A robust outreach program complemented these PI-led research activities, consisting of: 1) a roving post-doc program comprised of a corps of Center-appointed, co- or multi-sponsored post-doctoral fellows with rotating assignments to conduct seed projects initiated by at least two PIs, in residence with these sponsoring PIs, to rapidly pursue new and high-risk, high-payoff interdisciplinary ideas; 2) an annual summer school on combustion heavily attended (~200) by senior graduate students and practicing researchers covering advanced topics on chemical kinetics, fluid mechanics, turbulent combustion, engine combustion, new technologies, etc.; 3) a robust open web-site providing Center and community information as well as the lecture videos and notes of the summer school; and 4) widely distributed biannual newsletters.},
doi = {10.2172/1355751},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri May 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri May 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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