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Title: Connected Equipment Maturity Model Version 1.0

Abstract

The Connected Equipment Maturity Model (CEMM) evaluates the high-level functionality and characteristics that enable equipment to provide the four categories of energy-related services through communication with other entities (e.g., equipment, third parties, utilities, and users). The CEMM will help the U.S. Department of Energy, industry, energy efficiency organizations, and research institutions benchmark the current state of connected equipment and identify capabilities that may be attained to reach a more advanced, future state.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1355100
Report Number(s):
PNNL-26413
BT0304030
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
96 KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT AND PRESERVATION; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; Connected equipment maturity model; end-user services; end-user experience; grid services; energy market services; societal services; communication and networking; cybersecurity; maturity indicator level; CEMM; domains; categories; maturity questions; load control; interface agreement; interoperability; autonomous; measurement and verification; optimization

Citation Formats

Butzbaugh, Joshua B., Mayhorn, Ebony T., Sullivan, Greg, and Whalen, Scott A. Connected Equipment Maturity Model Version 1.0. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1355100.
Butzbaugh, Joshua B., Mayhorn, Ebony T., Sullivan, Greg, & Whalen, Scott A. Connected Equipment Maturity Model Version 1.0. United States. doi:10.2172/1355100.
Butzbaugh, Joshua B., Mayhorn, Ebony T., Sullivan, Greg, and Whalen, Scott A. Mon . "Connected Equipment Maturity Model Version 1.0". United States. doi:10.2172/1355100. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1355100.
@article{osti_1355100,
title = {Connected Equipment Maturity Model Version 1.0},
author = {Butzbaugh, Joshua B. and Mayhorn, Ebony T. and Sullivan, Greg and Whalen, Scott A.},
abstractNote = {The Connected Equipment Maturity Model (CEMM) evaluates the high-level functionality and characteristics that enable equipment to provide the four categories of energy-related services through communication with other entities (e.g., equipment, third parties, utilities, and users). The CEMM will help the U.S. Department of Energy, industry, energy efficiency organizations, and research institutions benchmark the current state of connected equipment and identify capabilities that may be attained to reach a more advanced, future state.},
doi = {10.2172/1355100},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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