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Title: Symmetry based assembly of a 2 dimensional protein lattice

Abstract

The design of proteins that self-assemble into higher order architectures is of great interest due to their potential application in nanotechnology. Specifically, the self-assembly of proteins into ordered lattices is of special interest to the field of structural biology. Here we designed a 2 dimensional (2D) protein lattice using a fusion of a tandem repeat of three TelSAM domains (TTT) to the Ferric uptake regulator (FUR) domain. We determined the structure of the designed (TTT-FUR) fusion protein to 2.3 Å by X-ray crystallographic methods. In agreement with the design, a 2D lattice composed of TelSAM fibers interdigitated by the FUR domain was observed. As expected, the fusion of a tandem repeat of three TelSAM domains formed 21 screw axis, and the self-assembly of the ordered oligomer was under pH control. We demonstrated that the fusion of TTT to a domain having a 2-fold symmetry, such as the FUR domain, can produce an ordered 2D lattice. The TTT-FUR system combines features from the rotational symmetry matching approach with the oligomer driven crystallization method. This TTT-FUR fusion was amenable to X-ray crystallographic methods, and is a promising crystallization chaperone.

Authors:
; ; ; ORCiD logo;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1355048
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: PLoS ONE; Journal Volume: 12; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Poulos, Sandra, Agah, Sayeh, Jallah, Nikardi, Faham, Salem, and van Raaij, Mark J. Symmetry based assembly of a 2 dimensional protein lattice. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0174485.
Poulos, Sandra, Agah, Sayeh, Jallah, Nikardi, Faham, Salem, & van Raaij, Mark J. Symmetry based assembly of a 2 dimensional protein lattice. United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0174485.
Poulos, Sandra, Agah, Sayeh, Jallah, Nikardi, Faham, Salem, and van Raaij, Mark J. Tue . "Symmetry based assembly of a 2 dimensional protein lattice". United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0174485.
@article{osti_1355048,
title = {Symmetry based assembly of a 2 dimensional protein lattice},
author = {Poulos, Sandra and Agah, Sayeh and Jallah, Nikardi and Faham, Salem and van Raaij, Mark J.},
abstractNote = {The design of proteins that self-assemble into higher order architectures is of great interest due to their potential application in nanotechnology. Specifically, the self-assembly of proteins into ordered lattices is of special interest to the field of structural biology. Here we designed a 2 dimensional (2D) protein lattice using a fusion of a tandem repeat of three TelSAM domains (TTT) to the Ferric uptake regulator (FUR) domain. We determined the structure of the designed (TTT-FUR) fusion protein to 2.3 Å by X-ray crystallographic methods. In agreement with the design, a 2D lattice composed of TelSAM fibers interdigitated by the FUR domain was observed. As expected, the fusion of a tandem repeat of three TelSAM domains formed 21 screw axis, and the self-assembly of the ordered oligomer was under pH control. We demonstrated that the fusion of TTT to a domain having a 2-fold symmetry, such as the FUR domain, can produce an ordered 2D lattice. The TTT-FUR system combines features from the rotational symmetry matching approach with the oligomer driven crystallization method. This TTT-FUR fusion was amenable to X-ray crystallographic methods, and is a promising crystallization chaperone.},
doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0174485},
journal = {PLoS ONE},
number = 4,
volume = 12,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Apr 18 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Apr 18 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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