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Title: Fermilab proton accelerator complex status and improvement plans

Abstract

Fermilab carries out an extensive program of accelerator-based high energy particle physics research at the Intensity Frontier that relies on the operation of 8 GeV and 120 GeV proton beamlines for a n umber of fixed target experiments. Routine operation with a world-record 700kW of average 120 GeV beam power on the neutrino target was achieved in 2017 as the result of the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP) upgrade. There are plans to further increase the power to 900 – 1000 kW. The next major upgrade of the FNAL accelerator complex, called PIP-II, is under development. It aims at 1.2MW beam power on target at the start of the LBNF/DUNE experiment in the middle of the next decade and assumes replacement of the existing 40-years old 400 MeV normal-conducting Linac with a modern 800 MeV superconducting RF linear accelerator. There are several concepts to further double the beam power to >2.4MW after replacement of the existing 8 GeV Booster synchrotron. In this article we discuss current performance of the Fermilab proton accelerator complex, the upgrade plans for the next two decades and the accelerator R&D program to address cost and performance risks for these upgrades.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1354865
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-PUB-17-129-APC
Journal ID: ISSN 0217-7323; 1597496
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Modern Physics Letters A
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 32; Journal Issue: 16; Journal ID: ISSN 0217-7323
Publisher:
World Scientific Publishing
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; High intensity accelerators; Neutrino physics; Fermilab; Space-charge effects

Citation Formats

Shiltsev, Vladimir. Fermilab proton accelerator complex status and improvement plans. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1142/S0217732317300129.
Shiltsev, Vladimir. Fermilab proton accelerator complex status and improvement plans. United States. doi:10.1142/S0217732317300129.
Shiltsev, Vladimir. 2017. "Fermilab proton accelerator complex status and improvement plans". United States. doi:10.1142/S0217732317300129.
@article{osti_1354865,
title = {Fermilab proton accelerator complex status and improvement plans},
author = {Shiltsev, Vladimir},
abstractNote = {Fermilab carries out an extensive program of accelerator-based high energy particle physics research at the Intensity Frontier that relies on the operation of 8 GeV and 120 GeV proton beamlines for a n umber of fixed target experiments. Routine operation with a world-record 700kW of average 120 GeV beam power on the neutrino target was achieved in 2017 as the result of the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP) upgrade. There are plans to further increase the power to 900 – 1000 kW. The next major upgrade of the FNAL accelerator complex, called PIP-II, is under development. It aims at 1.2MW beam power on target at the start of the LBNF/DUNE experiment in the middle of the next decade and assumes replacement of the existing 40-years old 400 MeV normal-conducting Linac with a modern 800 MeV superconducting RF linear accelerator. There are several concepts to further double the beam power to >2.4MW after replacement of the existing 8 GeV Booster synchrotron. In this article we discuss current performance of the Fermilab proton accelerator complex, the upgrade plans for the next two decades and the accelerator R&D program to address cost and performance risks for these upgrades.},
doi = {10.1142/S0217732317300129},
journal = {Modern Physics Letters A},
number = 16,
volume = 32,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

Journal Article:
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  • This paper describes the present performance and capability of the BNL AGS accelerator complex and possible future intensity upgrade plans. In 1995, the AGS reached its design upgrade goal of 6.0{center_dot}10{sup 13}ppp with the Booster. The AGS with a new fast extracted beam (FEB) system is able to perform single bunch multiple extraction at 30 Hz per AGS cycle for the g-2 experiment and for RHIC injection. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}
  • This paper describes the present performance and capability of the BNL AGS accelerator complex and possible future intensity upgrade plans. In 1995, the AGS reached its design upgrade goal of 6.0{center_dot}10{sup 13} ppp with the Booster. The AGS with a new fast extracted beam (FEB) system is able to perform single bunch multiple extraction at 30 Hz per AGS cycle for the g-2 experiment and for RHIC injection.
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