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Title: PV Reliability -- Where We've Been and Where We're Going

Abstract

The photovoltaic (PV) industry has demonstrated impressive progress toward deploying hardware with excellent quality. As module prices drop and designs are squeezed to reduce cost of materials and processing, how will this affect the failures that are seen in the field?

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
OSTI Identifier:
1354840
Report Number(s):
NREL/PR-5F00-68418
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at SNEC (2017) International Photovoltaic Power Generation Conference & Exhibition, 19-21 April 2017, Shanghai, China
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; PV reliability; PVQAT; delamination; degradation; encapsulant discoloration

Citation Formats

Kurtz, Sarah. PV Reliability -- Where We've Been and Where We're Going. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Kurtz, Sarah. PV Reliability -- Where We've Been and Where We're Going. United States.
Kurtz, Sarah. Thu . "PV Reliability -- Where We've Been and Where We're Going". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1354840.
@article{osti_1354840,
title = {PV Reliability -- Where We've Been and Where We're Going},
author = {Kurtz, Sarah},
abstractNote = {The photovoltaic (PV) industry has demonstrated impressive progress toward deploying hardware with excellent quality. As module prices drop and designs are squeezed to reduce cost of materials and processing, how will this affect the failures that are seen in the field?},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Apr 27 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Apr 27 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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