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Title: Understanding the Temporal and Spatial Variability of New Generation Gridded TMYs

Abstract

Presentation at ASHRAE about the spatial and temporal variability of gridded TMYs, discussing advanced GIS and Web services that allow for direct access to data, surface-based observations for thousands of stations, climate reanalysis data, and products derived from satellite data; new developments in NREL's solar databases based on both observed data and satellite-derived gridded data, status of TMY3 weather files, and NREL's plans for the next-generation TMY weather files; and also covers what is new and different in the Climatic Design Conditions Table in the 2013 ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
OSTI Identifier:
1354768
Report Number(s):
NREL/PR-6A20-68197
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the 2016 American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Annual Conference, 25-29 June 2016, St. Louis, Missouri
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; solar, ASHRAE; U.S. National Climatic Data Center; GIS; database; gridded data; TMY3; weather files; meteorological data; spatiotemporal variability

Citation Formats

Lopez, Anthony. Understanding the Temporal and Spatial Variability of New Generation Gridded TMYs. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Lopez, Anthony. Understanding the Temporal and Spatial Variability of New Generation Gridded TMYs. United States.
Lopez, Anthony. 2017. "Understanding the Temporal and Spatial Variability of New Generation Gridded TMYs". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1354768.
@article{osti_1354768,
title = {Understanding the Temporal and Spatial Variability of New Generation Gridded TMYs},
author = {Lopez, Anthony},
abstractNote = {Presentation at ASHRAE about the spatial and temporal variability of gridded TMYs, discussing advanced GIS and Web services that allow for direct access to data, surface-based observations for thousands of stations, climate reanalysis data, and products derived from satellite data; new developments in NREL's solar databases based on both observed data and satellite-derived gridded data, status of TMY3 weather files, and NREL's plans for the next-generation TMY weather files; and also covers what is new and different in the Climatic Design Conditions Table in the 2013 ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 4
}

Conference:
Other availability
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