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Title: Radiative Heat Transfer modelling in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine

Abstract

Detailed radiation modelling in piston engines has received relatively little attention to date. Recently, it is being revisited in light of current trends towards higher operating pressures and higher levels of exhaust-gas recirculation, both of which enhance molecular gas radiation. Advanced high-efficiency engines also are expected to function closer to the limits of stable operation, where even small perturbations to the energy balance can have a large influence on system behavior. Here several different spectral radiation property models and radiative transfer equation (RTE) solvers have been implemented in an OpenFOAM-based engine CFD code, and simulations have been performed for a heavy-duty diesel engine. Differences in computed temperature fields, NO and soot levels, and wall heat transfer rates are shown for different combinations of spectral models and RTE solvers. The relative importance of molecular gas radiation versus soot radiation is examined. And the influence of turbulence-radiation interactions is determined by comparing results obtained using local mean values of composition and temperature to compute radiative emission and absorption with those obtained using a particle-based transported probability density function method.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)
  2. Marquette University (United States)
  3. University of California Merced (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
The Pennsylvania State University
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V)
OSTI Identifier:
1354699
DOE Contract Number:
EE0007278
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: The 16th International Conference on Numerical Combustion, Orlando, FL, 3-5 April 2017
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS

Citation Formats

Paul, Chandan, Sircar, Arpan, Ferreyro-Fernandez, Sebastian, Imren, Abdurrahman, Haworth, Daniel C, Roy, Somesh P, Ge, Wenjun, and Modest, Michael F. Radiative Heat Transfer modelling in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Paul, Chandan, Sircar, Arpan, Ferreyro-Fernandez, Sebastian, Imren, Abdurrahman, Haworth, Daniel C, Roy, Somesh P, Ge, Wenjun, & Modest, Michael F. Radiative Heat Transfer modelling in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine. United States.
Paul, Chandan, Sircar, Arpan, Ferreyro-Fernandez, Sebastian, Imren, Abdurrahman, Haworth, Daniel C, Roy, Somesh P, Ge, Wenjun, and Modest, Michael F. Wed . "Radiative Heat Transfer modelling in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1354699.
@article{osti_1354699,
title = {Radiative Heat Transfer modelling in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine},
author = {Paul, Chandan and Sircar, Arpan and Ferreyro-Fernandez, Sebastian and Imren, Abdurrahman and Haworth, Daniel C and Roy, Somesh P and Ge, Wenjun and Modest, Michael F},
abstractNote = {Detailed radiation modelling in piston engines has received relatively little attention to date. Recently, it is being revisited in light of current trends towards higher operating pressures and higher levels of exhaust-gas recirculation, both of which enhance molecular gas radiation. Advanced high-efficiency engines also are expected to function closer to the limits of stable operation, where even small perturbations to the energy balance can have a large influence on system behavior. Here several different spectral radiation property models and radiative transfer equation (RTE) solvers have been implemented in an OpenFOAM-based engine CFD code, and simulations have been performed for a heavy-duty diesel engine. Differences in computed temperature fields, NO and soot levels, and wall heat transfer rates are shown for different combinations of spectral models and RTE solvers. The relative importance of molecular gas radiation versus soot radiation is examined. And the influence of turbulence-radiation interactions is determined by comparing results obtained using local mean values of composition and temperature to compute radiative emission and absorption with those obtained using a particle-based transported probability density function method.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Apr 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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