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Title: Changes of storm properties in the United States: Observations and multimodel ensemble projections

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1353490
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Global and Planetary Change
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 142; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-06 09:45:36; Journal ID: ISSN 0921-8181
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Jiang, Peng, Yu, Zhongbo, Gautam, Mahesh R., Yuan, Feifei, and Acharya, Kumud. Changes of storm properties in the United States: Observations and multimodel ensemble projections. Netherlands: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.gloplacha.2016.05.001.
Jiang, Peng, Yu, Zhongbo, Gautam, Mahesh R., Yuan, Feifei, & Acharya, Kumud. Changes of storm properties in the United States: Observations and multimodel ensemble projections. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.gloplacha.2016.05.001.
Jiang, Peng, Yu, Zhongbo, Gautam, Mahesh R., Yuan, Feifei, and Acharya, Kumud. 2016. "Changes of storm properties in the United States: Observations and multimodel ensemble projections". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.gloplacha.2016.05.001.
@article{osti_1353490,
title = {Changes of storm properties in the United States: Observations and multimodel ensemble projections},
author = {Jiang, Peng and Yu, Zhongbo and Gautam, Mahesh R. and Yuan, Feifei and Acharya, Kumud},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.gloplacha.2016.05.001},
journal = {Global and Planetary Change},
number = C,
volume = 142,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.gloplacha.2016.05.001

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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