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Title: A Method for Estimating Potential Energy and Cost Savings for Cooling Existing Data Centers

Abstract

NREL has developed a methodology to prioritize which data center cooling systems could be upgraded for better efficiency based on estimated cost savings and economics. The best efficiency results are in cool or dry climates where 'free' economizer or evaporative cooling can provide most of the data center cooling. Locations with a high cost of energy and facilities with high power usage effectiveness (PUE) are also good candidates for data center cooling system upgrades. In one case study of a major cable provider's data centers, most of the sites studied had opportunities for cost-effective cooling system upgrades with payback period of 5 years or less. If the cable provider invested in all opportunities for upgrades with payback periods of less than 15 years, it could save 27% on annual energy costs.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Time Warner Cable/Charter Communications
OSTI Identifier:
1353419
Report Number(s):
NREL/FS-7A40-68218
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; data center cooling; system upgrades; Alternative Cooling for Data Centers Tool; best practices for low-energy cooling technology; maximum cooling energy savings; data center cooling technologies; alternative cooling strategies

Citation Formats

Van Geet, Otto. A Method for Estimating Potential Energy and Cost Savings for Cooling Existing Data Centers. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Van Geet, Otto. A Method for Estimating Potential Energy and Cost Savings for Cooling Existing Data Centers. United States.
Van Geet, Otto. 2017. "A Method for Estimating Potential Energy and Cost Savings for Cooling Existing Data Centers". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1353419.
@article{osti_1353419,
title = {A Method for Estimating Potential Energy and Cost Savings for Cooling Existing Data Centers},
author = {Van Geet, Otto},
abstractNote = {NREL has developed a methodology to prioritize which data center cooling systems could be upgraded for better efficiency based on estimated cost savings and economics. The best efficiency results are in cool or dry climates where 'free' economizer or evaporative cooling can provide most of the data center cooling. Locations with a high cost of energy and facilities with high power usage effectiveness (PUE) are also good candidates for data center cooling system upgrades. In one case study of a major cable provider's data centers, most of the sites studied had opportunities for cost-effective cooling system upgrades with payback period of 5 years or less. If the cable provider invested in all opportunities for upgrades with payback periods of less than 15 years, it could save 27% on annual energy costs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 4
}
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