skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: low-Cost, High-Performance Alternatives for Target Temperature Monitoring Using the Near-Infrared Spectrum

Abstract

A process is being developed for commercial production of the medical isotope Mo-99 through a photo-nuclear reaction on a Mo-100 target using a highpower electron accelerator. This process requires temperature monitoring of the window through which a high-current electron beam is transmitted to the target. For this purpose, we evaluated two near infrared technologies: the OMEGA Engineering iR2 pyrometer and the Ocean Optics Maya2000 spectrometer with infrared-enhanced charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor. Measuring in the near infrared spectrum, in contrast to the long-wavelength infrared spectrum, offers a few immediate advantages: (1) ordinary glass or quartz optical elements can be used; (2) alignment can be performed without heating the target; and (3) emissivity corrections to temperature are typically less than 10%. If spatial resolution is not required, the infrared pyrometer is attractive because of its accuracy, low cost, and simplicity. If spatial resolution is required, we make recommendations for near-infrared imaging based on our data augmented by calculations

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20)
OSTI Identifier:
1353376
Report Number(s):
ANL/NE-17/3
135173
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION

Citation Formats

Virgo, Mathew, Quigley, Kevin J., Chemerisov, Sergey, and Vandegrift, George F. low-Cost, High-Performance Alternatives for Target Temperature Monitoring Using the Near-Infrared Spectrum. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1353376.
Virgo, Mathew, Quigley, Kevin J., Chemerisov, Sergey, & Vandegrift, George F. low-Cost, High-Performance Alternatives for Target Temperature Monitoring Using the Near-Infrared Spectrum. United States. doi:10.2172/1353376.
Virgo, Mathew, Quigley, Kevin J., Chemerisov, Sergey, and Vandegrift, George F. Wed . "low-Cost, High-Performance Alternatives for Target Temperature Monitoring Using the Near-Infrared Spectrum". United States. doi:10.2172/1353376. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1353376.
@article{osti_1353376,
title = {low-Cost, High-Performance Alternatives for Target Temperature Monitoring Using the Near-Infrared Spectrum},
author = {Virgo, Mathew and Quigley, Kevin J. and Chemerisov, Sergey and Vandegrift, George F.},
abstractNote = {A process is being developed for commercial production of the medical isotope Mo-99 through a photo-nuclear reaction on a Mo-100 target using a highpower electron accelerator. This process requires temperature monitoring of the window through which a high-current electron beam is transmitted to the target. For this purpose, we evaluated two near infrared technologies: the OMEGA Engineering iR2 pyrometer and the Ocean Optics Maya2000 spectrometer with infrared-enhanced charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor. Measuring in the near infrared spectrum, in contrast to the long-wavelength infrared spectrum, offers a few immediate advantages: (1) ordinary glass or quartz optical elements can be used; (2) alignment can be performed without heating the target; and (3) emissivity corrections to temperature are typically less than 10%. If spatial resolution is not required, the infrared pyrometer is attractive because of its accuracy, low cost, and simplicity. If spatial resolution is required, we make recommendations for near-infrared imaging based on our data augmented by calculations},
doi = {10.2172/1353376},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • Norwich Technologies (NT) is developing a disruptively superior solar field for trough concentrating solar power (CSP). Troughs are the leading CSP technology (85% of installed capacity), being highly deployable and similar to photovoltaic (PV) systems for siting. NT has developed the SunTrap receiver, a disruptive alternative to vacuum-tube concentrating solar power (CSP) receivers, a market currently dominated by the Schott PTR-70. The SunTrap receiver will (1) operate at higher temperature (T) by using an insulated, recessed radiation-collection system to overcome the energy losses that plague vacuum-tube receivers at high T, (2) decrease acquisition costs via simpler structure, and (3) dramaticallymore » increase reliability by eliminating vacuum. It offers comparable optical efficiency with thermal loss reduction from ≥ 26% (at presently standard T) to ≥ 55% (at high T), lower acquisition costs, and near-zero O&M costs.« less
  • Fast cameras already installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have be equipped with near-infrared (NIR) filters in order to measure the surface temperature in the lower divertor region. Such a system provides a unique combination of high speed (> 50 kHz) and wide fi eld-of-view (> 50% of the divertor). Benchtop calibrations demonstrated the system's ability to measure thermal emission down to 330 oC. There is also, however, signi cant plasma light background in NSTX. Without improvements in background reduction, the current system is incapable of measuring signals below the background equivalent temperature (600 - 700 oC). Thermalmore » signatures have been detected in cases of extreme divertor heating. It is observed that the divertor can reach temperatures around 800 oC when high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating is used. These temperature profiles were fi t using a simple heat diffusion code, providing a measurement of the heat flux to the divertor. Comparisons to other infrared thermography systems on NSTX are made.« less
  • A method for observing the infrared spectrum of matrix isolated high- temperature vapors, as applied to lithium fluoride, was developed. This method provides a convenient technique for observing the infrared spectrum of hightemperature vapors in equilibrium with a condensed substrate. An apparatus was developed that is capable of obtaining the infrared spectrum of matrix- isolated vapor molecules generated by Knudsen effusion. The fundamental vibrational frequency of lithium fiuoride was observed in argon, krynton, xenon, and nitrogen matrices. Shifts in this frequency due to the interactions with the various matrices were explained on a basis of a semiclassical model. (auth)
  • The paper gives results of comprehensive calorimeter tests on a semihermetic compressor with chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-114, hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)-236ea, and HFC-236fa over a wide range of temperature test conditions: evaporating temperatures from 0 to 35 C and condensing temperatures from 40 to 110 C. Parameters assessed as criteria for performance evaluation and for reliable performance include: cooling capacity; electric power input, current, and voltage; coefficients of performance; compressor volumetric and isentropic efficiencies; and discharge and oil temperatures. Polyolester oil was used as lubricant in the compressor.
  • A need to monitor on-site performance of solar-domestic water heaters has been universally identified throughout the solar industry. A low cost method for accomplishing this objective is described. This system utilizes a moderate amount of basic instrumentation for data acquisition and a manual data reduction technique. Comparative testing of the method using two separate configurations of commonly available instruments is reported. Results and observations noted in these tests are discussed in detail. Descriptions of the instrumentation and its installation and the equations applied in the data analyses are also included.