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Title: NMR Metabolomics in Ionizing Radiation

Abstract

Ionizing radiation is an invisible threat that cannot be seen, touched or smelled and exist either as particles or waves. Particle radiation can take the form of alpha, beta or neutrons, as well as high energy space particle radiation such as high energy iron, carbon and proton radiation, etc. (1) Non-particle radiation includes gamma- and x-rays. Publically, there is a growing concern about the adverse health effects due to ionizing radiation mainly because of the following facts. (a) The X-ray diagnostic images are taken routinely on patients. Even though the overall dosage from a single X-ray image such as a chest X-ray scan or a CT scan, also called X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT), is low, repeated usage can cause serious health consequences, in particular with the possibility of developing cancer (2, 3). (b) Human space exploration has gone beyond moon and is planning to send human to the orbit of Mars by the mid-2030s. And a landing on Mars will follow.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1353346
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-120277
49158; 400412000
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Clinics in Oncology, 1:1080
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Hu, Jian Z., Xiao, Xiongjie, and Hu, Mary Y. NMR Metabolomics in Ionizing Radiation. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Hu, Jian Z., Xiao, Xiongjie, & Hu, Mary Y. NMR Metabolomics in Ionizing Radiation. United States.
Hu, Jian Z., Xiao, Xiongjie, and Hu, Mary Y. 2016. "NMR Metabolomics in Ionizing Radiation". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1353346,
title = {NMR Metabolomics in Ionizing Radiation},
author = {Hu, Jian Z. and Xiao, Xiongjie and Hu, Mary Y.},
abstractNote = {Ionizing radiation is an invisible threat that cannot be seen, touched or smelled and exist either as particles or waves. Particle radiation can take the form of alpha, beta or neutrons, as well as high energy space particle radiation such as high energy iron, carbon and proton radiation, etc. (1) Non-particle radiation includes gamma- and x-rays. Publically, there is a growing concern about the adverse health effects due to ionizing radiation mainly because of the following facts. (a) The X-ray diagnostic images are taken routinely on patients. Even though the overall dosage from a single X-ray image such as a chest X-ray scan or a CT scan, also called X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT), is low, repeated usage can cause serious health consequences, in particular with the possibility of developing cancer (2, 3). (b) Human space exploration has gone beyond moon and is planning to send human to the orbit of Mars by the mid-2030s. And a landing on Mars will follow.},
doi = {},
journal = {Clinics in Oncology, 1:1080},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
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