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Title: Editorial: Integrative Research on Organic Matter Cycling across Aquatic Gradients

Abstract

The interface between freshwater and marine ecosystems provides a unique setting to examine the evolution of biogeochemical components derived from the landscape, inland waters, estuaries, and the ocean across distinct physiochemical gradients. A diverse body of work exploring this research topic is highlighted here with the goal of integrating our understanding of how organic matter (OM) is transported and transformed along the terrestrial-aquatic continuum and sparking interdisciplinary discussions on future research needs. The movement of water ultimately controls the transport and transformation of geochemical components as they move from land to sea, and, as such, contributions to this research topic will be described within the context of the hydrological cycle, starting with rainfall.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1353336
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-124200
Journal ID: ISSN 2296-7745
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Frontiers in Marine Science; Journal Volume: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
carbon; cycling; aquatic; terrestrial; marine; continuum; gradients; organic; tidal; wetland; coastal; carbon dioxide; methane; greenhouse gas

Citation Formats

Ward, Nicholas D. Editorial: Integrative Research on Organic Matter Cycling across Aquatic Gradients. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3389/fmars.2017.00131.
Ward, Nicholas D. Editorial: Integrative Research on Organic Matter Cycling across Aquatic Gradients. United States. doi:10.3389/fmars.2017.00131.
Ward, Nicholas D. Thu . "Editorial: Integrative Research on Organic Matter Cycling across Aquatic Gradients". United States. doi:10.3389/fmars.2017.00131.
@article{osti_1353336,
title = {Editorial: Integrative Research on Organic Matter Cycling across Aquatic Gradients},
author = {Ward, Nicholas D.},
abstractNote = {The interface between freshwater and marine ecosystems provides a unique setting to examine the evolution of biogeochemical components derived from the landscape, inland waters, estuaries, and the ocean across distinct physiochemical gradients. A diverse body of work exploring this research topic is highlighted here with the goal of integrating our understanding of how organic matter (OM) is transported and transformed along the terrestrial-aquatic continuum and sparking interdisciplinary discussions on future research needs. The movement of water ultimately controls the transport and transformation of geochemical components as they move from land to sea, and, as such, contributions to this research topic will be described within the context of the hydrological cycle, starting with rainfall.},
doi = {10.3389/fmars.2017.00131},
journal = {Frontiers in Marine Science},
number = ,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu May 04 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu May 04 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • The goal of this research topic was to motivate innovative research that blurs traditional disciplinary and geographical boundaries. As the scientific community continues to gain momentum and knowledge about how the natural world functions, it is increasingly important that we recognize the interconnected nature of earth systems and embrace the complexities of ecosystem transitions. We are pleased to present this body of work, which embodies the spirit of research spanning across the terrestrial-aquatic continuum, from mountains to the sea.
  • Here, this collection of papers, written by researchers at the national labs, in academia, and in industry present real problems, massive and complex datasets, and novel statistical approaches motivated by the challenges presented by experimental and computational science. You'll find explorations of the trajectories of aircraft and of the light curves of supernovae, of computer network intrusions and of nuclear forensics, of photovoltaics and overhead imagery.
  • The purpose of this review is to highlight progress in unraveling carbon cycling dynamics across the continuum of landscapes, inland waters, coastal oceans, and the atmosphere. Earth systems are intimately interconnected, yet most biogeochemical studies focus on specific components in isolation. The movement of water drives the carbon cycle, and, as such, inland waters provide a critical intersection between terrestrial and marine biospheres. Inland, estuarine, and coastal waters are well studied in regions near centers of human population in the Northern hemisphere. However, many of the world’s large river systems and their marine receiving waters remain poorly characterized, particularly inmore » the tropics, which contribute to a disproportionately large fraction of the transformation of terrestrial organic matter to carbon dioxide, and the Arctic, where positive feedback mechanisms are likely to amplify global climate change. There are large gaps in current coverage of environmental observations along the aquatic continuum. For example, tidally-influenced reaches of major rivers and near-shore coastal regions around river plumes are often left out of carbon budgets due to a combination of methodological constraints and poor data coverage. We suggest that closing these gaps could potentially alter global estimates of CO2 outgassing from surface waters to the atmosphere by several-fold. Finally, in order to identify and constrain/embrace uncertainties in global carbon budget estimations it is important that we further adopt statistical and modeling approaches that have become well-established in the fields of oceanography and paleoclimatology, for example.« less
  • The sulfur isotopic composition of the sulfur fluxes occurring in the anoxic marine sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, N.C., U.S.A., was determined, and the result of isotopic mass balance was obtained via the differential diffusion model. Seasonal pore water sulfate delta/sup 34/S measurements yielded a calculated sulfate input of 0.6 per thousand. Sulfate transported into the sediments via diffusion appeared to be enriched in the lighter isotope because its concentration gradient was steeper, due to the increase in the measured isotopic composition of sulfate with depth. Similarly, the back diffusion of dissolved sulfide towards the sediment-water interface appeared enriched inmore » the heavier isotope. The isotopic composition of this flux was calculated from measurements of the delta/sup 34/S of dissolved sulfide and was determined to be 15.9 per thousand. The isotopic composition of buried sulfide was determined to be -5.2 per thousand and the detrital sulfur input was estimated to be -6.2 per thousand. An isotope mass balance equation based upon the fluxes at the sediment-water interface successfully predicted the isotopic composition of the buried sulfur flux within 0.5 per thousand, thus confirming that isotopes diffuse in response to their individual concentration gradients.« less
  • A simple integrative technique for locating and monitoring polynuclear aromatic hydrogen discharges to aquatic environments is described. The technique involves anchoring artificial substrates cut from a commercial oil-adsorbant cloth (3M Co.) near suspected sources of contamination. Analytical methodology involves mild ethanolic extraction and liquid-liquid partitioning to isolate a polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon containing fraction that is amenable to analysis by high-pressure liquid chromatography.