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Title: When evolution is the solution to pollution: Key principles, and lessons from rapid repeated adaptation of killifish ( Fundulus heteroclitus ) populations

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4];  [5]
  1. Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California Davis, Davis CA USA
  2. Atlantic Ecology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, US Environmental Protection Agency, Narragansett RI USA
  3. Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs CT USA
  4. Department of Biology, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole MA USA, Superfund Research Program, Boston University, Boston MA USA
  5. Atlantic Ecology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, Narragansett RI USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1353288
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1353289
Grant/Contract Number:
DW92429801
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Evolutionary Applications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 8; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-11-10 00:12:16; Journal ID: ISSN 1752-4571
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Whitehead, Andrew, Clark, Bryan W., Reid, Noah M., Hahn, Mark E., and Nacci, Diane. When evolution is the solution to pollution: Key principles, and lessons from rapid repeated adaptation of killifish ( Fundulus heteroclitus ) populations. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/eva.12470.
Whitehead, Andrew, Clark, Bryan W., Reid, Noah M., Hahn, Mark E., & Nacci, Diane. When evolution is the solution to pollution: Key principles, and lessons from rapid repeated adaptation of killifish ( Fundulus heteroclitus ) populations. United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/eva.12470.
Whitehead, Andrew, Clark, Bryan W., Reid, Noah M., Hahn, Mark E., and Nacci, Diane. Wed . "When evolution is the solution to pollution: Key principles, and lessons from rapid repeated adaptation of killifish ( Fundulus heteroclitus ) populations". United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/eva.12470.
@article{osti_1353288,
title = {When evolution is the solution to pollution: Key principles, and lessons from rapid repeated adaptation of killifish ( Fundulus heteroclitus ) populations},
author = {Whitehead, Andrew and Clark, Bryan W. and Reid, Noah M. and Hahn, Mark E. and Nacci, Diane},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/eva.12470},
journal = {Evolutionary Applications},
number = 8,
volume = 10,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Wed Apr 26 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Apr 26 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1111/eva.12470

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • Cited by 1
  • Killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) eggs from a polluted creed (Piles Creek (PC)) and a relatively pristine estuary in Long Island (LI) were exposed for 20 min to various concentrations of methylmercuric chloride (MeHg) prior to combination with untreated sperm. PC killifish eggs showed a higher LC/sub 50/ value (1.7 mg/liter) than LI eggs (0.7 mg/liter). PC eggs that were fertilized by nontreated sperm after exposure to 1.0 or 2.5 mg/liter meHg and then placed in clean sea water (15 parts per thousand) for 1 week showed a 5 and 7% malformations of the embryos, respectively. However, exposure of LI eggs tomore » 1.0 mg/liter prior to fertilization caused 32% malformations of the embryos, and at 2.5 mg/liter almost all the embryos died. The data indicate that LI killifish eggs are less tolerant to meHg than PC eggs. This is in keeping with previous data on embryonic tolerance to meHg in these two populations. However, 96-hr LC/sub 50/ values of juvenile fish (25-45 mm standard length) did not differ between these two populations.« less
  • Extraintestinal calcium influxes were measured in the killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, in solutions with different calcium concentrations, from distilled water level (near 0) to seawater level (approximately 12 mM). The extraintestinal influx is modified by the concentration of calcium in the medium during the adaptive period. In freshwater-adapted fish, calcium depletion resulted in an increase in calcium uptake. Such an adaptation was not observed in calcium-depleted fish in artificial calcium-deficient seawater. Calcium depletion in either medium seems to increase the calcium permeability. No correlation was found between Ca-ATPase activity in the gill tissue and calcium uptake.
  • The experiments were designed to study the effects of mercury, lead and cadmium on fin regeneration in Fundulus. One mg/l mercury was lethal to the fish and all died before the first measurement. Fish in lead regenerated at slightly faster rates than the control fish. Cadmium strikingly retarded the rate of regeneration, although the effect was not correlated with the dose. This may be attributed to a limit in the amount of cadmium that the fish can accumulate. (MU)
  • A comparative study of the chorions of eggs of northern and southern populations of Fundulus heteroclitus by scanning and transmission electron microscopy reveals striking differences. Chorionic fibrils of eggs of the northern (Woods Hole) population are very long, approx. 1.5 ..mu.. in diameter, and very sparsely distributed; the chorionic surface between attached fibrils is dotted with small protuberances. Most of the fibrils of the eggs of a southern (South Carolina) population are shorter, approx. 0.5 ..mu.. in diameter, and very densely distributed. The South Carolina eggs have a few longer and thicker (approx. 1.0 ..mu..) fibrils in the vicinity ofmore » the micropyle. The fibrils of the Woods Hole eggs are club-shaped at their bases, surrounded by a collar of ''jelly'' at their attachment points, and are seated in an indentation in the chorion. Those of the South Carolina eggs show no such basal modifications and appear to extend from a small chorionic hillock. A surface coat of jelly is present on the ovulated eggs of both populations but appears to be thicker and denser on the eggs of southern origin. Scanning electron microscopy of freeze-fractured preparations of ovarian tissue from the two populations shows that the chorionic fibrils are present and attached to the developing chorion as soon as it is visible. Jelly is not present on the surface on the unovulated eggs. The data are discussed from the standpoint of considerations of the taxonomy and distribution of the species, and questions are raised concerning the possible significance of the structural differences observed.« less