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Title: Transcriptional Analysis of Flowering Time in Switchgrass

Abstract

Over the past two decades, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) has emerged as a priority biofuel feedstock. The bulk of switchgrass biomass is in the vegetative portion of the plant; therefore, increasing the length of vegetative growth will lead to an increase in overall biomass yield. The goal of this study was to gain insight into the control of flowering time in switchgrass that would assist in development of cultivars with longer vegetative phases through delayed flowering. RNA sequencing was used to assess genome-wide expression profiles across a developmental series between switchgrass genotypes belonging to the two main ecotypes: upland, typically early flowering, and lowland, typically late flowering. Leaf blades and tissues enriched for the shoot apical meristem (SAM) were collected in a developmental series from emergence through anthesis for RNA extraction. RNA from samples that flanked the SAM transition stage was sequenced for expression analyses. The analyses revealed differential expression patterns between early- and late-flowering genotypes for known flowering time orthologs. Namely, genes shown to play roles in photoperiod response and the circadian clock in other species were identified as potential candidates for regulating flowering time in the switchgrass genotypes analyzed. Based on their expression patterns, many of the differentially expressedmore » genes could also be classified as putative promoters or repressors of flowering. The candidate genes presented here may be used to guide switchgrass improvement through marker-assisted breeding and/or transgenic or gene editing approaches.Over the past two decades, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) has emerged as a priority biofuel feedstock. The bulk of switchgrass biomass is in the vegetative portion of the plant; therefore, increasing the length of vegetative growth will lead to an increase in overall biomass yield. The goal of this study was to gain insight into the control of flowering time in switchgrass that would assist in development of cultivars with longer vegetative phases through delayed flowering. RNA sequencing was used to assess genome-wide expression profiles across a developmental series between switchgrass genotypes belonging to the two main ecotypes: upland, typically early flowering, and lowland, typically late flowering. Leaf blades and tissues enriched for the shoot apical meristem (SAM) were collected in a developmental series from emergence through anthesis for RNA extraction. RNA from samples that flanked the SAM transition stage was sequenced for expression analyses. The analyses revealed differential expression patterns between early- and late-flowering genotypes for known flowering time orthologs. Namely, genes shown to play roles in photoperiod response and the circadian clock in other species were identified as potential candidates for regulating flowering time in the switchgrass genotypes analyzed. Based on their expression patterns, many of the differentially expressed genes could also be classified as putative promoters or repressors of flowering. The candidate genes presented here may then be used to guide switchgrass improvement through marker-assisted breeding and/or transgenic or gene editing approaches.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [1];  [4]
  1. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Agronomy and Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center
  2. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Plant Biology and Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center
  3. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Plant Biology and Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center; Monsanto Company, Chesterfield, MO (United States)
  4. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Agronomy and Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center; US Dairy Forage Research Center, Madison, WI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1353267
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1427702
Grant/Contract Number:  
FC02-07ER64494; AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
BioEnergy Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 1939-1234
Publisher:
Springer
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; Switchgrass; Biomass; Flowering time; RNAseq; Differential expression

Citation Formats

Tornqvist, Carl-Erik, Vaillancourt, Brieanne, Kim, Jeongwoon, Buell, C. Robin, Kaeppler, Shawn M., and Casler, Michael D.. Transcriptional Analysis of Flowering Time in Switchgrass. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/s12155-017-9832-9.
Tornqvist, Carl-Erik, Vaillancourt, Brieanne, Kim, Jeongwoon, Buell, C. Robin, Kaeppler, Shawn M., & Casler, Michael D.. Transcriptional Analysis of Flowering Time in Switchgrass. United States. doi:10.1007/s12155-017-9832-9.
Tornqvist, Carl-Erik, Vaillancourt, Brieanne, Kim, Jeongwoon, Buell, C. Robin, Kaeppler, Shawn M., and Casler, Michael D.. Thu . "Transcriptional Analysis of Flowering Time in Switchgrass". United States. doi:10.1007/s12155-017-9832-9.
@article{osti_1353267,
title = {Transcriptional Analysis of Flowering Time in Switchgrass},
author = {Tornqvist, Carl-Erik and Vaillancourt, Brieanne and Kim, Jeongwoon and Buell, C. Robin and Kaeppler, Shawn M. and Casler, Michael D.},
abstractNote = {Over the past two decades, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) has emerged as a priority biofuel feedstock. The bulk of switchgrass biomass is in the vegetative portion of the plant; therefore, increasing the length of vegetative growth will lead to an increase in overall biomass yield. The goal of this study was to gain insight into the control of flowering time in switchgrass that would assist in development of cultivars with longer vegetative phases through delayed flowering. RNA sequencing was used to assess genome-wide expression profiles across a developmental series between switchgrass genotypes belonging to the two main ecotypes: upland, typically early flowering, and lowland, typically late flowering. Leaf blades and tissues enriched for the shoot apical meristem (SAM) were collected in a developmental series from emergence through anthesis for RNA extraction. RNA from samples that flanked the SAM transition stage was sequenced for expression analyses. The analyses revealed differential expression patterns between early- and late-flowering genotypes for known flowering time orthologs. Namely, genes shown to play roles in photoperiod response and the circadian clock in other species were identified as potential candidates for regulating flowering time in the switchgrass genotypes analyzed. Based on their expression patterns, many of the differentially expressed genes could also be classified as putative promoters or repressors of flowering. The candidate genes presented here may be used to guide switchgrass improvement through marker-assisted breeding and/or transgenic or gene editing approaches.Over the past two decades, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) has emerged as a priority biofuel feedstock. The bulk of switchgrass biomass is in the vegetative portion of the plant; therefore, increasing the length of vegetative growth will lead to an increase in overall biomass yield. The goal of this study was to gain insight into the control of flowering time in switchgrass that would assist in development of cultivars with longer vegetative phases through delayed flowering. RNA sequencing was used to assess genome-wide expression profiles across a developmental series between switchgrass genotypes belonging to the two main ecotypes: upland, typically early flowering, and lowland, typically late flowering. Leaf blades and tissues enriched for the shoot apical meristem (SAM) were collected in a developmental series from emergence through anthesis for RNA extraction. RNA from samples that flanked the SAM transition stage was sequenced for expression analyses. The analyses revealed differential expression patterns between early- and late-flowering genotypes for known flowering time orthologs. Namely, genes shown to play roles in photoperiod response and the circadian clock in other species were identified as potential candidates for regulating flowering time in the switchgrass genotypes analyzed. Based on their expression patterns, many of the differentially expressed genes could also be classified as putative promoters or repressors of flowering. The candidate genes presented here may then be used to guide switchgrass improvement through marker-assisted breeding and/or transgenic or gene editing approaches.},
doi = {10.1007/s12155-017-9832-9},
journal = {BioEnergy Research},
number = 3,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Apr 27 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Apr 27 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1007/s12155-017-9832-9

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