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Title: Engineering the Structural and Electronic Phases of MoTe 2 through W Substitution

Abstract

MoTe 2 is an exfoliable transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) that crystallizes in three symmetries: the semiconducting trigonal-prismatic 2H- or α-phase, the semimetallic and monoclinic 1T'- or β-phase, and the semimetallic orthorhombic γ-structure. The 2H-phase displays a band gap of ~1 eV making it appealing for flexible and transparent optoelectronics. The γ-phase is predicted to possess unique topological properties that might lead to topologically protected nondissipative transport channels. Recently, it was argued that it is possible to locally induce phase-transformations in TMDs, through chemical doping, local heating, or electric-field to achieve ohmic contacts or to induce useful functionalities such as electronic phase-change memory elements. The combination of semiconducting and topological elements based upon the same compound might produce a new generation of high performance, low dissipation optoelectronic elements. Here, we show that it is possible to engineer the phases of MoTe2 through W substitution by unveiling the phase-diagram of the Mo 1–xW xTe 2 solid solution, which displays a semiconducting to semimetallic transition as a function of x. We find that a small critical W concentration xc ~ 8% stabilizes the γ-phase at room temperature. Lastly, this suggests that crystals with x close to xc might be particularly susceptible to phasemore » transformations induced by an external perturbation, for example, an electric field. Photoemission spectroscopy, indicates that the γ-phase possesses a Fermi surface akin to that of WTe 2.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [5];  [6]; ORCiD logo [7];  [2];  [2];  [8];  [9];  [9];  [9];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [10];  [11];  [12] more »;  [13];  [14];  [14];  [13];  [13];  [15];  [16];  [17];  [18];  [6];  [9];  [2]; ORCiD logo [19] « less
  1. Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab. (MagLab); Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics
  2. Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
  3. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
  4. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry
  5. Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics
  6. Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics
  7. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
  8. Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Materials Research Science and Engineering Center; State Univ. of New York (SUNY), New York, NY (United States). Fashion Inst. of Technology (FIT), Dept. of Science and Mathematics
  9. Army Research Lab., Adelphi, MD (United States). Sensors and Electronic Devices Directorate
  10. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Photon Ultrafast Laser Science and Engineering Inst. (PULSE)
  11. Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering
  12. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)
  13. Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Beijing National Lab. for Condensed Matter Physics, and Inst. of Physics
  14. Renmin Univ. of China, Beijing (China). Dept. of Physics
  15. Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics
  16. Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Columbia Nano Initiative
  17. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Photon Ultrafast Laser Science and Engineering Inst. (PULSE); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science (SIMES)
  18. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Science and Engineering
  19. Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab. (MagLab)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1353195
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0012704; 2013CB921700; 2015CB921300; W911NF-11-1-0362; GBMF4545; AC02-76SF00515; FA9550-11-1-0010; FA9550-14-1-0268; NA0002135; FG02-04ER46157; 11234014; 11274381; 11474340; DMR-1610110; XDB07000000; LPDS 2013-13
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nano Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 17; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 1530-6984
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Electron Microscopy; Phase-Transformations; Photoemission Spectroscopy; Raman spectroscopy; Transition-metal-dichalcogenides; Weyl semimetals

Citation Formats

Rhodes, D., Chenet, D. A., Janicek, B. E., Nyby, C., Lin, Y., Jin, W., Edelberg, D., Mannebach, E., Finney, N., Antony, A., Schiros, T., Klarr, T., Mazzoni, A., Chin, M., Chiu, Y. -c, Zheng, W., Zhang, Q. R., Ernst, F., Dadap, J. I., Tong, X., Ma, J., Lou, R., Wang, S., Qian, T., Ding, H., Osgood, R. M., Paley, D. W., Lindenberg, A. M., Huang, P. Y., Pasupathy, A. N., Dubey, M., Hone, J., and Balicas, L. Engineering the Structural and Electronic Phases of MoTe2 through W Substitution. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b04814.
Rhodes, D., Chenet, D. A., Janicek, B. E., Nyby, C., Lin, Y., Jin, W., Edelberg, D., Mannebach, E., Finney, N., Antony, A., Schiros, T., Klarr, T., Mazzoni, A., Chin, M., Chiu, Y. -c, Zheng, W., Zhang, Q. R., Ernst, F., Dadap, J. I., Tong, X., Ma, J., Lou, R., Wang, S., Qian, T., Ding, H., Osgood, R. M., Paley, D. W., Lindenberg, A. M., Huang, P. Y., Pasupathy, A. N., Dubey, M., Hone, J., & Balicas, L. Engineering the Structural and Electronic Phases of MoTe2 through W Substitution. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b04814.
Rhodes, D., Chenet, D. A., Janicek, B. E., Nyby, C., Lin, Y., Jin, W., Edelberg, D., Mannebach, E., Finney, N., Antony, A., Schiros, T., Klarr, T., Mazzoni, A., Chin, M., Chiu, Y. -c, Zheng, W., Zhang, Q. R., Ernst, F., Dadap, J. I., Tong, X., Ma, J., Lou, R., Wang, S., Qian, T., Ding, H., Osgood, R. M., Paley, D. W., Lindenberg, A. M., Huang, P. Y., Pasupathy, A. N., Dubey, M., Hone, J., and Balicas, L. Wed . "Engineering the Structural and Electronic Phases of MoTe2 through W Substitution". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b04814. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1353195.
@article{osti_1353195,
title = {Engineering the Structural and Electronic Phases of MoTe2 through W Substitution},
author = {Rhodes, D. and Chenet, D. A. and Janicek, B. E. and Nyby, C. and Lin, Y. and Jin, W. and Edelberg, D. and Mannebach, E. and Finney, N. and Antony, A. and Schiros, T. and Klarr, T. and Mazzoni, A. and Chin, M. and Chiu, Y. -c and Zheng, W. and Zhang, Q. R. and Ernst, F. and Dadap, J. I. and Tong, X. and Ma, J. and Lou, R. and Wang, S. and Qian, T. and Ding, H. and Osgood, R. M. and Paley, D. W. and Lindenberg, A. M. and Huang, P. Y. and Pasupathy, A. N. and Dubey, M. and Hone, J. and Balicas, L.},
abstractNote = {MoTe2 is an exfoliable transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) that crystallizes in three symmetries: the semiconducting trigonal-prismatic 2H- or α-phase, the semimetallic and monoclinic 1T'- or β-phase, and the semimetallic orthorhombic γ-structure. The 2H-phase displays a band gap of ~1 eV making it appealing for flexible and transparent optoelectronics. The γ-phase is predicted to possess unique topological properties that might lead to topologically protected nondissipative transport channels. Recently, it was argued that it is possible to locally induce phase-transformations in TMDs, through chemical doping, local heating, or electric-field to achieve ohmic contacts or to induce useful functionalities such as electronic phase-change memory elements. The combination of semiconducting and topological elements based upon the same compound might produce a new generation of high performance, low dissipation optoelectronic elements. Here, we show that it is possible to engineer the phases of MoTe2 through W substitution by unveiling the phase-diagram of the Mo1–xWxTe2 solid solution, which displays a semiconducting to semimetallic transition as a function of x. We find that a small critical W concentration xc ~ 8% stabilizes the γ-phase at room temperature. Lastly, this suggests that crystals with x close to xc might be particularly susceptible to phase transformations induced by an external perturbation, for example, an electric field. Photoemission spectroscopy, indicates that the γ-phase possesses a Fermi surface akin to that of WTe2.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b04814},
journal = {Nano Letters},
number = 3,
volume = 17,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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