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Title: Feasibility study of SiGHT: a novel ultra low background photosensor for low temperature operation

Abstract

Rare event search experiments, such as those searching for dark matter and observations of neutrinoless double beta decay, require ultra low levels of radioactive background for unmistakable identification. In order to reduce the radioactive background of detectors used in these types of event searches, low background photosensors are required, as the physical size of these detectors become increasing larger, and hence the number of such photosensors used also increases rapidly. Considering that most dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay experiments are turning towards using noble liquids as the target choice, liquid xenon and liquid argon for instance, photosensors that can work well at cryogenic temperatures are required, 165 K and 87 K for liquid xenon and liquid argon, respectively. The Silicon Geiger Hybrid Tube (SiGHT) is a novel photosensor designed specifically for use in ultra low background experiments operating at cryogenic temperatures. It is based on the proven photocathode plus silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) hybrid technology and consists of very few other, but also ultra radio-pure, materials like fused silica and silicon for the SiPM. Lastly, the introduction of the SiGHT concept, as well as a feasibility study for its production, is reported in this article.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [10];  [11];  [12];  [5]
  1. Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics, Key Lab. of Particle Astrophysics; Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). School of Physical Sciences
  2. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
  3. Univ. of Naples Federico II (Italy). Dept. of Physics; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Napoli (Italy)
  4. Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics
  5. Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics, Key Lab. of Particle Astrophysics
  6. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), L'aquila (Italy). Lab. Nazionali del Gran Sasso (INFN-LNGS); Univ. of Houston, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Physics
  7. Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics
  8. Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), L'aquila (Italy). Lab. Nazionali del Gran Sasso (INFN-LNGS)
  9. Univ. of Houston, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Physics
  10. Univ. of Naples Federico II (Italy). Dept. of Physics; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Napoli (Italy); Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics
  11. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), L'aquila (Italy). Lab. Nazionali del Gran Sasso (INFN-LNGS)
  12. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; National Science Foundation (NSF); Chinese Academy of Sciences
OSTI Identifier:
1353114
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515; PHY-1314501; PHY-1413358; PHY-1455351
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Instrumentation
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 12; Journal Issue: 02; Journal ID: ISSN 1748-0221
Publisher:
Institute of Physics (IOP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; Cryogenic detectors; Hybrid detectors; Noble liquid detectors (scintillation, ionization, double-phase); Photon detectors for UV, visible and IR photons (vacuum) (photomultipliers, HPDs, others)

Citation Formats

Wang, Y., Fan, A., Fiorillo, G., Galbiati, C., Guan, M. Y., Korga, G., Pantic, E., Razeto, A., Renshaw, A., Rossi, B., Suvorov, Y., Wang, H., and Yang, C. G. Feasibility study of SiGHT: a novel ultra low background photosensor for low temperature operation. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1088/1748-0221/12/02/P02019.
Wang, Y., Fan, A., Fiorillo, G., Galbiati, C., Guan, M. Y., Korga, G., Pantic, E., Razeto, A., Renshaw, A., Rossi, B., Suvorov, Y., Wang, H., & Yang, C. G. Feasibility study of SiGHT: a novel ultra low background photosensor for low temperature operation. United States. doi:10.1088/1748-0221/12/02/P02019.
Wang, Y., Fan, A., Fiorillo, G., Galbiati, C., Guan, M. Y., Korga, G., Pantic, E., Razeto, A., Renshaw, A., Rossi, B., Suvorov, Y., Wang, H., and Yang, C. G. Mon . "Feasibility study of SiGHT: a novel ultra low background photosensor for low temperature operation". United States. doi:10.1088/1748-0221/12/02/P02019. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1353114.
@article{osti_1353114,
title = {Feasibility study of SiGHT: a novel ultra low background photosensor for low temperature operation},
author = {Wang, Y. and Fan, A. and Fiorillo, G. and Galbiati, C. and Guan, M. Y. and Korga, G. and Pantic, E. and Razeto, A. and Renshaw, A. and Rossi, B. and Suvorov, Y. and Wang, H. and Yang, C. G.},
abstractNote = {Rare event search experiments, such as those searching for dark matter and observations of neutrinoless double beta decay, require ultra low levels of radioactive background for unmistakable identification. In order to reduce the radioactive background of detectors used in these types of event searches, low background photosensors are required, as the physical size of these detectors become increasing larger, and hence the number of such photosensors used also increases rapidly. Considering that most dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay experiments are turning towards using noble liquids as the target choice, liquid xenon and liquid argon for instance, photosensors that can work well at cryogenic temperatures are required, 165 K and 87 K for liquid xenon and liquid argon, respectively. The Silicon Geiger Hybrid Tube (SiGHT) is a novel photosensor designed specifically for use in ultra low background experiments operating at cryogenic temperatures. It is based on the proven photocathode plus silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) hybrid technology and consists of very few other, but also ultra radio-pure, materials like fused silica and silicon for the SiPM. Lastly, the introduction of the SiGHT concept, as well as a feasibility study for its production, is reported in this article.},
doi = {10.1088/1748-0221/12/02/P02019},
journal = {Journal of Instrumentation},
number = 02,
volume = 12,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 27 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Feb 27 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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