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Title: Peak season carbon exchange shifts from a sink to a source following 50+ years of herbivore exclusion in an Arctic tundra ecosystem

Abstract

To date, the majority of our knowledge regarding the impacts of herbivory on arctic ecosystem function has been restricted to short-term (<5 years) exclusion or manipulation experiments. Here, our understanding of long-term responses of sustained herbivory and/or herbivore exclusion on arctic tundra ecosystem function is severely limited.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [3]
  1. Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United State); Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)
  2. Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States); St. Edwards Univ., Austin, TX (United States)
  3. Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)
  4. Grand Valley State Univ., Grand Rapids, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1353022
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-29111
Journal ID: ISSN 0022-0477
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Ecology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 105; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-0477
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; earth sciences; albedo; Barrow; biogeochemistry; carbon; herbivore exclusion; herbivory; Lemmus trimucronatus; methane; net ecosystem exchange; plant-herbivore interactions

Citation Formats

Lara, Mark J., Johnson, David R., Andresen, Christian, Hollister, Robert D., and Tweedie, Craig E. Peak season carbon exchange shifts from a sink to a source following 50+ years of herbivore exclusion in an Arctic tundra ecosystem. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1111/1365-2745.12654.
Lara, Mark J., Johnson, David R., Andresen, Christian, Hollister, Robert D., & Tweedie, Craig E. Peak season carbon exchange shifts from a sink to a source following 50+ years of herbivore exclusion in an Arctic tundra ecosystem. United States. doi:10.1111/1365-2745.12654.
Lara, Mark J., Johnson, David R., Andresen, Christian, Hollister, Robert D., and Tweedie, Craig E. Sat . "Peak season carbon exchange shifts from a sink to a source following 50+ years of herbivore exclusion in an Arctic tundra ecosystem". United States. doi:10.1111/1365-2745.12654. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1353022.
@article{osti_1353022,
title = {Peak season carbon exchange shifts from a sink to a source following 50+ years of herbivore exclusion in an Arctic tundra ecosystem},
author = {Lara, Mark J. and Johnson, David R. and Andresen, Christian and Hollister, Robert D. and Tweedie, Craig E.},
abstractNote = {To date, the majority of our knowledge regarding the impacts of herbivory on arctic ecosystem function has been restricted to short-term (<5 years) exclusion or manipulation experiments. Here, our understanding of long-term responses of sustained herbivory and/or herbivore exclusion on arctic tundra ecosystem function is severely limited.},
doi = {10.1111/1365-2745.12654},
journal = {Journal of Ecology},
number = 1,
volume = 105,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Aug 27 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Sat Aug 27 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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