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Title: Computational Studies of Pyrolysis and Upgrading of Bio-oils: Virtual Special Issue

Abstract

As research activities continue, our understanding of biomass pyrolysis has been significantly elevated and we sought to arrange this Virtual Special Issue (VSI) in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering to report recent progress on computational and experimental studies of biomass pyrolysis. Beyond highlighting the five national laboratories' advancements, prestigious researchers in the field of biomass pyrolysis have been invited to report their most recent activities.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  2. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1352997
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5100-68404
Journal ID: ISSN 2168-0485
Grant/Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 2168-0485
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; biomass pyrolysis; computational studies; bio-oils

Citation Formats

Xiong, Qingang, and Robichaud, David J. Computational Studies of Pyrolysis and Upgrading of Bio-oils: Virtual Special Issue. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acssuschemeng.7b00805.
Xiong, Qingang, & Robichaud, David J. Computational Studies of Pyrolysis and Upgrading of Bio-oils: Virtual Special Issue. United States. doi:10.1021/acssuschemeng.7b00805.
Xiong, Qingang, and Robichaud, David J. Thu . "Computational Studies of Pyrolysis and Upgrading of Bio-oils: Virtual Special Issue". United States. doi:10.1021/acssuschemeng.7b00805. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1352997.
@article{osti_1352997,
title = {Computational Studies of Pyrolysis and Upgrading of Bio-oils: Virtual Special Issue},
author = {Xiong, Qingang and Robichaud, David J.},
abstractNote = {As research activities continue, our understanding of biomass pyrolysis has been significantly elevated and we sought to arrange this Virtual Special Issue (VSI) in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering to report recent progress on computational and experimental studies of biomass pyrolysis. Beyond highlighting the five national laboratories' advancements, prestigious researchers in the field of biomass pyrolysis have been invited to report their most recent activities.},
doi = {10.1021/acssuschemeng.7b00805},
journal = {ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering},
number = 4,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 23 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Mar 23 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

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  • Liquid transportation fuel blend-stocks were produced by pyrolysis and catalytic upgrading of woody residue biomass. Mountain pine beetle killed wood and hog fuel from a saw mill were pyrolyzed in a 1 kg/h fluidized bed reactor and subsequently upgraded to hydrocarbons in a continuous fixed bed hydrotreater. Upgrading was performed by catalytic hydrotreatment in a two-stage bed at 170°C and 405°C with a per bed LHSV between 0.17 and 0.19. The overall yields from biomass to upgraded fuel were similar for both feeds: 24-25% despite the differences in bio-oil (intermediate) mass yield. Pyrolysis bio-oil mass yield was 61% from MPBKmore » wood, and subsequent upgrading of the bio-oil gave an average mass yield of 41% to liquid fuel blend stocks. Hydrogen was consumed at an average of 0.042g/g of bio-oil fed, with final oxygen content in the product fuel ranging from 0.31% to 1.58% over the course of the test. Comparatively for hog fuel, pyrolysis bio-oil mass yield was lower at 54% due to inorganics in the biomass, but subsequent upgrading of that bio-oil had an average mass yield of 45% to liquid fuel, resulting in a similar final mass yield to fuel compared to the cleaner MPBK wood. Hydrogen consumption for the hog fuel upgrading averaged 0.041 g/g of bio-oil fed, and the final oxygen content of the product fuel ranged from 0.09% to 2.4% over the run. While it was confirmed that inorganic laded biomass yields less bio-oil, this work demonstrated that the resultant bio-oil can be upgraded to hydrocarbons at a higher yield than bio-oil from clean wood. Thus the final hydrocarbon yield from clean or residue biomass pyrolysis/upgrading was similar.« less
  • Cited by 41
  • The original idea of this special issue was to document a representative selection of the work presented at the conference in one place and to provide a snapshot of the q-bio field. However, we must acknowledge that this idea was only partially realized. The papers in this special issue are biased toward the theoretical and computational end of the q-bio spectrum, even though they are contributed by researchers dedicated to the q-bio ideal of complete stories and include contributions from research groups that are well known for their experimental work. Like the conference itself, this special issue was something ofmore » an experiment, as papers generally do not accompany presentations at biological meetings to the same extent as in other fields, such as computer science. Thus, the contributors of the papers collected here are truly pioneers.« less