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Title: Fulfilling the promise of the materials genome initiative with high-throughput experimental methodologies

Abstract

The Materials Genome Initiative, a national effort to introduce new materials into the market faster and at lower cost, has made significant progress in computational simulation and modeling of materials. To build on this progress, a large amount of experimental data for validating these models, and informing more sophisticated ones, will be required. High-throughput experimentation generates large volumes of experimental data using combinatorial materials synthesis and rapid measurement techniques, making it an ideal experimental complement to bring the Materials Genome Initiative vision to fruition. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art results, opportunities, and challenges in high-throughput experimentation for materials design. As a result, a major conclusion is that an effort to deploy a federated network of high-throughput experimental (synthesis and characterization) tools, which are integrated with a modern materials data infrastructure, is needed.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [4];  [5]; ORCiD logo [6];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [1];  [1];  [10];  [11]; ORCiD logo [1];  [7];  [12]
  1. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States)
  2. Google, Mountain View, CA (United States)
  3. Applied Materials, Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States)
  4. Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)
  5. Charles Stark Draper Lab., Cambridge, MA (United States)
  6. Bangor Univ., Gwynedd (United Kingdom)
  7. Intermolecular, Inc., San Jose, CA (United States)
  8. Clark Street Assoc., Palo Alto, CA (United States)
  9. Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP), Pasadena, CA (United States)
  10. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
  11. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  12. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE); NREL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD)
OSTI Identifier:
1352994
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5K00-68391
Journal ID: ISSN 1931-9401
Grant/Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Reviews
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 1931-9401
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; materials properties; advanced materials; materials analysis; stress strain relations; semiconductor materials

Citation Formats

Green, Martin L., Choi, C. L., Hattrick-Simpers, J. R., Joshi, A. M., Takeuchi, I., Barron, S. C., Campo, E., Chiang, T., Empedocles, S., Gregoire, J. M., Kusne, A. G., Martin, J., Mehta, A., Persson, K., Trautt, Z., Van Duren, J., and Zakutayev, A. Fulfilling the promise of the materials genome initiative with high-throughput experimental methodologies. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4977487.
Green, Martin L., Choi, C. L., Hattrick-Simpers, J. R., Joshi, A. M., Takeuchi, I., Barron, S. C., Campo, E., Chiang, T., Empedocles, S., Gregoire, J. M., Kusne, A. G., Martin, J., Mehta, A., Persson, K., Trautt, Z., Van Duren, J., & Zakutayev, A. Fulfilling the promise of the materials genome initiative with high-throughput experimental methodologies. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4977487.
Green, Martin L., Choi, C. L., Hattrick-Simpers, J. R., Joshi, A. M., Takeuchi, I., Barron, S. C., Campo, E., Chiang, T., Empedocles, S., Gregoire, J. M., Kusne, A. G., Martin, J., Mehta, A., Persson, K., Trautt, Z., Van Duren, J., and Zakutayev, A. Tue . "Fulfilling the promise of the materials genome initiative with high-throughput experimental methodologies". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4977487. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1352994.
@article{osti_1352994,
title = {Fulfilling the promise of the materials genome initiative with high-throughput experimental methodologies},
author = {Green, Martin L. and Choi, C. L. and Hattrick-Simpers, J. R. and Joshi, A. M. and Takeuchi, I. and Barron, S. C. and Campo, E. and Chiang, T. and Empedocles, S. and Gregoire, J. M. and Kusne, A. G. and Martin, J. and Mehta, A. and Persson, K. and Trautt, Z. and Van Duren, J. and Zakutayev, A.},
abstractNote = {The Materials Genome Initiative, a national effort to introduce new materials into the market faster and at lower cost, has made significant progress in computational simulation and modeling of materials. To build on this progress, a large amount of experimental data for validating these models, and informing more sophisticated ones, will be required. High-throughput experimentation generates large volumes of experimental data using combinatorial materials synthesis and rapid measurement techniques, making it an ideal experimental complement to bring the Materials Genome Initiative vision to fruition. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art results, opportunities, and challenges in high-throughput experimentation for materials design. As a result, a major conclusion is that an effort to deploy a federated network of high-throughput experimental (synthesis and characterization) tools, which are integrated with a modern materials data infrastructure, is needed.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4977487},
journal = {Applied Physics Reviews},
number = 1,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Mar 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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