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Title: Adsorption Equilibrium and Kinetics at Goethite-Water and Related Interfaces

Abstract

This research study is an important component of a broader comprehensive project, “Geochemistry of Interfaces: From Surfaces to Interlayers to Clusters,” which sought to identify and evaluate the critical molecular phenomena at metal-oxide interfaces that control many geochemical and environmental processes. The primary goal of this research study was to better understand and predict adsorption of metal ions at mineral/water surfaces. Macroscopic data in traditional batch experiments was used to develop predictive models that characterize sorption in complex systems containing a wide range of background solution compositions. Our studies focused on systems involving alkaline earth metal (Mg 2+, Ca 2+, Sr 2+, Ba 2+) and heavy metal (Hg 2+, Co 2+, Cd 2+, Cu 2+, Zn 2+, Pb 2+) cations. The anions we selected for study included Cl -, NO 3 -, ClO 4 -, SO 4 2-, CO 3 2- and SeO 3 2- and the background electrolyte cations we examined included (Na +, K +, Rb + and Cs +) because these represent a range of ion sizes and have varying potentials for forming ion-pairs or ternary complexes with the metal ions studied. The research led to the development of a modified titration congruency approach for estimating sitemore » densities for mineral oxides such as goethite. The CD-MUSIC version of the surface complexation modeling approach was applied to potentiometric titration data and macroscopic adsorption data for single-solute heavy metals, oxyanions, alkaline earth metals and background electrolytes over a range of pH and ionic strength. The model was capable of predicting sorption in bi-solute systems containing multiple cations, cations and oxyanions, and transition metal cations and alkaline earth metal ions. Incorporation of ternary complexes was required for modeling Pb(II)-Se(IV) and Cd(II)-Se(IV) systems. -Both crystal face contributions and capacitance values were shown to be sensitive to varying specific surface area but were successfully accounted for in the modeling strategy. The insights gained from the macroscopic, spectroscopic and CD-MUSIC modeling developed in this study can be used to guide the implementation of less complex models which may be more applicable to field conditions. The findings of this research suggest that surface complexation models can be used as a predictive tool for fate and transport modeling of metal ions and oxyanions in fresh and saline systems typical of energy production waters and wastewaters.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1352819
Report Number(s):
DOE-UT-15496
DOE Contract Number:  
FG02-04ER15496
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES; 42 ENGINEERING; Adsorption; Metal Ions; Contaminants; Fate and Transport; Oxide Minerals; Surface Complexation

Citation Formats

Katz, Lynn Ellen. Adsorption Equilibrium and Kinetics at Goethite-Water and Related Interfaces. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1352819.
Katz, Lynn Ellen. Adsorption Equilibrium and Kinetics at Goethite-Water and Related Interfaces. United States. doi:10.2172/1352819.
Katz, Lynn Ellen. Sat . "Adsorption Equilibrium and Kinetics at Goethite-Water and Related Interfaces". United States. doi:10.2172/1352819. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1352819.
@article{osti_1352819,
title = {Adsorption Equilibrium and Kinetics at Goethite-Water and Related Interfaces},
author = {Katz, Lynn Ellen},
abstractNote = {This research study is an important component of a broader comprehensive project, “Geochemistry of Interfaces: From Surfaces to Interlayers to Clusters,” which sought to identify and evaluate the critical molecular phenomena at metal-oxide interfaces that control many geochemical and environmental processes. The primary goal of this research study was to better understand and predict adsorption of metal ions at mineral/water surfaces. Macroscopic data in traditional batch experiments was used to develop predictive models that characterize sorption in complex systems containing a wide range of background solution compositions. Our studies focused on systems involving alkaline earth metal (Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+) and heavy metal (Hg2+, Co2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Pb2+) cations. The anions we selected for study included Cl-, NO3-, ClO4-, SO42-, CO32- and SeO32- and the background electrolyte cations we examined included (Na+, K+, Rb+ and Cs+) because these represent a range of ion sizes and have varying potentials for forming ion-pairs or ternary complexes with the metal ions studied. The research led to the development of a modified titration congruency approach for estimating site densities for mineral oxides such as goethite. The CD-MUSIC version of the surface complexation modeling approach was applied to potentiometric titration data and macroscopic adsorption data for single-solute heavy metals, oxyanions, alkaline earth metals and background electrolytes over a range of pH and ionic strength. The model was capable of predicting sorption in bi-solute systems containing multiple cations, cations and oxyanions, and transition metal cations and alkaline earth metal ions. Incorporation of ternary complexes was required for modeling Pb(II)-Se(IV) and Cd(II)-Se(IV) systems. -Both crystal face contributions and capacitance values were shown to be sensitive to varying specific surface area but were successfully accounted for in the modeling strategy. The insights gained from the macroscopic, spectroscopic and CD-MUSIC modeling developed in this study can be used to guide the implementation of less complex models which may be more applicable to field conditions. The findings of this research suggest that surface complexation models can be used as a predictive tool for fate and transport modeling of metal ions and oxyanions in fresh and saline systems typical of energy production waters and wastewaters.},
doi = {10.2172/1352819},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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